Strathclyde, University of

 

Overall ranking: Came 41st out of 124 in the Complete University Guide for 2014.

History: The University of Strathclyde began in 1796 when John Anderson, professor of natural philosophy at Glasgow University, left instructions in his will for "a place of useful learning" - a university open to everyone.

Address: Two campuses: John Anderson, in the trendy Merchant City area in Glasgow's city centre; and Jordanhill, four miles away in the West End.

Ambience: Offers courses which are relevant to industry and commerce and there's a strong social scene. City centre campus is urban and mainly modern and there are landscaped gardens on the site of the former Rottenrow hospital. Jordanhill is parkland, lovely in summer and great for sport.

Who's the boss? Professor Jim McDonald is principal and vice-chancellor.

Prospectus: 0141 548 2762 or visit the website here.

UCAS code: S78

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Not particularly. Entry requirements are given in grades rather than UCAS tariff points, with many courses, such as business and economics, asking for AAA at A-level or AAAA at Scottish Highers. The university is keen on widening access and adult returner students are encouraged to apply.

Vital statistics: Has 13,000 undergraduates and around 7,000 postgrads. The majority of students, 70 per cent, come from the local area, although students from more than 100 countries are also on campus.

Added value: Investing £350m into its campus over a decade. Every student can take classes in entrepreneurship, covering business start-up and development. Most departments offer at least one study abroad option. The university has its own student employment service to help them make ends meet. They have a good relationship with industry for science, engineering and business students.

Teaching: Came 56th out of 124 in the Complete University Guide.

Research: Came 45th out of 124 in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

Graduate prospects: 33rd out of 124 with 72.3 per cent finding graduate level employment.

Any accommodation? Yes, 1,440 students live in the University's campus village in the heart of the John Anderson Campus. A further 400 live in University accommodation within close walking distance of the Campus. Rents are £72 - £112  per week

Cheap to live there? Yep. Average rents locally are around £65 per week.

Transport links: City centre campus served by nearby train, subway and bus stations. Jordanhill served by bus and trains and there is a shuttle bus between the city centre campus and Jordanhill eight times a day. 20-minute drive to the airport.

Fees: Scottish and EU students do not have to pay any fees. Students from England, Northern Ireland and Wales will pay £9,000 per year.

Bursaries: A number of scholarships are available to new undergraduates based on various criteria. See the website for details.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: The union has six bars, and has a reputation for kick-starting local bands. Glasgow's nightlife and club scene are legendary and Strathclyde is right in the thick of it.

Sporting reputation: Pretty sporty - 49th out of 148 universities and colleges in the BUCS 2012/13 league table. Sports centre with badminton and squash courts, a gym and a swimming pool, plus acres of playing fields.

Glittering alumni: Elish Angiolini QC, Scotland's Lord Advocate; John Logie Baird, inventor of the television; James Boyle, chief of the Scottish Arts Council; writers Andrew O'Hagan and Denise Mina; Craig Brown, former Scotland football manager; Tom Hunter, entrepreneur.

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