Trinity Saint David, University of Wales

 

 

History: St David's College was born in 1822 before coming University of Wales Lampeter in 1995. Trinity University College Carmarthen formed in 1848 to train teachers for church schools in England and Wales, and received University College status in 2009. The two were merged in 2010 to create the newly formed University of Wales Trinity Saint David. The Swansea campus - formerly Swansea Metropolitan University- is made up of three former colleges of Art, Teacher Education and Technology, which were founded in 1853, 1872 and 1897 respectively. In August 2013 the university merged with Swansea Metropolitan University to create the new UWTSD.

Address: Three campuses. The first is in Carmarthen, a busy town in south-west Wales and, according to Arthurian legend, the birthplace of Merlin. The second, in Lampeter, is 25 miles up the road, a little market town so remote it doesn't have a train station. Third is the more urban Swansea campus.

Ambience: Close to lovely countryside and coastline, rolling hills, Pembrokeshire, Brecon Beacons, sandy beaches, rivers, and medieval castles, offering fantastic outdoor activities such as canoeing and hill walking. Both the Lampater and Carmarthen campuses are based around the original 19th-century buildings. The Swansea campus is slap-bang in the centre of the city.

Who's the boss? Professor Medwin Hughes is in charge and a keen supporter of the education and arts in Wales.

Prospectus: 01267 676 767 (Carmarthen campus); 01570 422 351 (Lampeter Campus);  01792 481000 (Swansea campus) or visit the website here.

UCAS code: T80

What you need to know

Easy to get into? For vocational degrees and HND/C qualifications, UWTSD request 160 UCAS points. The average UCAS points is around 200-240, for courses like business, art, humanities, and performing arts. For courses like engineering, entry requirements can go up to 360 points, and request A-levels in maths or physics. The university doesn't judge a student's GCSE grades unless they are applying for a teaching course.

Vital statistics: The UWTSD has 11,550 students, when taking all partnership colleges into account. Offers courses from certificates of higher education right up to PhDs. Has an excellent reputation in education, the creative, cultural and performing arts, as well as courses related to business, tourism, outdoors and community development. The Lampeter site is the oldest university college in England and Wales, after Oxbridge and specialises in arts and humanities.

Added value: This being Wales, it's big on sport and singing. Notably good at rugby. Sports facilities at Carmarthen include an indoor climbing wall and swimming pool. Great natural resources for outdoor pursuits in the area. University is proud of its performing arts and its links with the media and arts industries in Wales. And it's bilingual: there are lots of Welsh speakers and most courses can be followed in English or Welsh, or in both languages. Many students get the opportunity to spend three months in Europe on an Erasmus programme. The university recently launched the 'skills for the worldplace' qualification into all of the undergraduate degree programmes, in an effort to help students learn more about employment-related skills 'in saturated markets'. UWTSD now offer a multitude of ways for a student to get a degree at any level, including part time during normal hours, and part time outside of normal hours (evenings and weekends), and distance/online learning for certain courses. The university have also announced a new multi million pound campus being planned for the Swansea marina. The new centre which will incorporate the majority of faculties based in Swansea and will be completed by the end of the decade.

Any accommodation? Yes. Prices in Swansea start from £63, Carmarthen are from £88 and Lampeter rents start from £68 a week.

Cheap to live there? Yes - privately rented rooms can be bagged for as little as £65 per week.

Transport links: At the end of the M4, so you can whiz back and forth to London. Carmarthen is 40 minutes down the dual carriageway to Fishguard and a ferry to Ireland. Regular trains to Carmarthen and Swansea, but Lampeter is a little more difficult to get to via public transport.

Fees: Welsh students pay £3,685 for a full-time undergraduate degree, due to Welsh Assembly grants, while students from the rest of the UK and EU pay £7,500. The university say the fee amount may change 'due to consultation currently ongoing.'

Bursaries: A number of scholarships of £500 are available for students studying specific subjects. There are also means-tested bursaries available for students from low-income families and Welsh language scholarships. For more information, visit the website.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: The students' union at Carmarthen has a nightclub called Unity and an Attic Bar. Trinity has its own theatre, used regularly by touring companies as well as for student productions. Try one of the 60 pubs or four nightclubs in Carmarthen too. Swansea is very lively, check out Wind Street, famous for its array of bars and so-called "super-clubs". Things in Lampeter are a bit more low-key, and students make their own entertainment. Aberystwyth is the nearest nightspot. The Old Bar is the main students' union drinking spot and puts on an eclectic mix of students nights, there is another nightclub in Lampeter, called Oxygen.

Glittering alumni: None as yet, but there's a host of big names that went to the university. Rugby stars Barry John and Carwyn James, and world famous tenor Stuart Burrows world famous tenor went to Trinity University College Carmarthen. As for Lampeter, its graduates include: Christopher Herbert, former Bishop of St Albans; opera guru and former BBC producer; writer Jack Higgins and Sulak Sivaraska, Thai human rights campaigner.

Voices
Barn owls are among species that could be affected
charity appeal
Sport
After another poor series in Sri Lanka, Alastair Cook claimed all players go through a lean period
cricketEoin Morgan reportedly to take over ODI captaincy as ECB finally wield the axe
Arts and Entertainment
a clockwork orange, stanley kubrick
film
News
news... you won't believe how bad their skills were
PROMOTED VIDEO

Day In a Page

Homeless Veterans appeal: 'You look for someone who's an inspiration and try to be like them'

Homeless Veterans appeal

In 2010, Sgt Gary Jamieson stepped on an IED in Afghanistan and lost his legs and an arm. He reveals what, and who, helped him to make a remarkable recovery
Could cannabis oil reverse the effects of cancer?

Could cannabis oil reverse effects of cancer?

As a film following six patients receiving the controversial treatment is released, Kate Hilpern uncovers a very slippery issue
The Interview movie review: You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here

The Interview movie review

You can't see Seth Rogen and James Franco's Kim Jong Un assassination film, but you can read about it here
Serial mania has propelled podcasts into the cultural mainstream

How podcasts became mainstream

People have consumed gripping armchair investigation Serial with a relish typically reserved for box-set binges
Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up for hipster marketing companies

Jesus Christ has become an unlikely pin-up

Kevin Lee Light, aka "Jesus", is the newest client of creative agency Mother while rival agency Anomaly has launched Sexy Jesus, depicting the Messiah in a series of Athena-style poses
Rosetta space mission voted most important scientific breakthrough of 2014

A memorable year for science – if not for mice

The most important scientific breakthroughs of 2014
Christmas cocktails to make you merry: From eggnog to Brown Betty and Rum Bumpo

Christmas cocktails to make you merry

Mulled wine is an essential seasonal treat. But now drinkers are rediscovering other traditional festive tipples. Angela Clutton raises a glass to Christmas cocktails
5 best activity trackers

Fitness technology: 5 best activity trackers

Up the ante in your regimen and change the habits of a lifetime with this wearable tech
Paul Scholes column: It's a little-known fact, but I have played one of the seven dwarves

Paul Scholes column

It's a little-known fact, but I have played one of the seven dwarves
Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Fifa's travelling circus once again steals limelight from real stars

Club World Cup kicked into the long grass by the continued farce surrounding Blatter, Garcia, Russia and Qatar
Frank Warren column: 2014 – boxing is back and winning new fans

Frank Warren: Boxing is back and winning new fans

2014 proves it's now one of sport's biggest hitters again
Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton: The power dynamics of the two first families

Jeb Bush vs Hillary Clinton

Karen Tumulty explores the power dynamics of the two first families
Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley with a hotbed of technology start-ups

Stockholm is rivalling Silicon Valley

The Swedish capital is home to two of the most popular video games in the world, as well as thousands of technology start-ups worth hundreds of millions of pounds – and it's all happened since 2009
Did Japanese workers really get their symbols mixed up and display Santa on a crucifix?

Crucified Santa: Urban myth refuses to die

The story goes that Japanese store workers created a life-size effigy of a smiling "Father Kurisumasu" attached to a facsimile of Our Lord's final instrument of torture
Jennifer Saunders and Kate Moss join David Walliams on set for TV adaptation of The Boy in the Dress

The Boy in the Dress: On set with the stars

Walliams' story about a boy who goes to school in a dress will be shown this Christmas