Trinity Saint David, University of Wales

 

 

History: St David's College was born in 1822 before coming University of Wales Lampeter in 1995. Trinity University College Carmarthen formed in 1848 to train teachers for church schools in England and Wales, and received University College status in 2009. The two were merged in 2010 to create the newly formed University of Wales Trinity Saint David. The Swansea campus - formerly Swansea Metropolitan University- is made up of three former colleges of Art, Teacher Education and Technology, which were founded in 1853, 1872 and 1897 respectively. In August 2013 the university merged with Swansea Metropolitan University to create the new UWTSD.

Address: Three campuses. The first is in Carmarthen, a busy town in south-west Wales and, according to Arthurian legend, the birthplace of Merlin. The second, in Lampeter, is 25 miles up the road, a little market town so remote it doesn't have a train station. Third is the more urban Swansea campus.

Ambience: Close to lovely countryside and coastline, rolling hills, Pembrokeshire, Brecon Beacons, sandy beaches, rivers, and medieval castles, offering fantastic outdoor activities such as canoeing and hill walking. Both the Lampater and Carmarthen campuses are based around the original 19th-century buildings. The Swansea campus is slap-bang in the centre of the city.

Who's the boss? Professor Medwin Hughes is in charge and a keen supporter of the education and arts in Wales.

Prospectus: 01267 676 767 (Carmarthen campus); 01570 422 351 (Lampeter Campus);  01792 481000 (Swansea campus) or visit the website here.

UCAS code: T80

What you need to know

Easy to get into? For vocational degrees and HND/C qualifications, UWTSD request 160 UCAS points. The average UCAS points is around 200-240, for courses like business, art, humanities, and performing arts. For courses like engineering, entry requirements can go up to 360 points, and request A-levels in maths or physics. The university doesn't judge a student's GCSE grades unless they are applying for a teaching course.

Vital statistics: The UWTSD has 11,550 students, when taking all partnership colleges into account. Offers courses from certificates of higher education right up to PhDs. Has an excellent reputation in education, the creative, cultural and performing arts, as well as courses related to business, tourism, outdoors and community development. The Lampeter site is the oldest university college in England and Wales, after Oxbridge and specialises in arts and humanities.

Added value: This being Wales, it's big on sport and singing. Notably good at rugby. Sports facilities at Carmarthen include an indoor climbing wall and swimming pool. Great natural resources for outdoor pursuits in the area. University is proud of its performing arts and its links with the media and arts industries in Wales. And it's bilingual: there are lots of Welsh speakers and most courses can be followed in English or Welsh, or in both languages. Many students get the opportunity to spend three months in Europe on an Erasmus programme. The university recently launched the 'skills for the worldplace' qualification into all of the undergraduate degree programmes, in an effort to help students learn more about employment-related skills 'in saturated markets'. UWTSD now offer a multitude of ways for a student to get a degree at any level, including part time during normal hours, and part time outside of normal hours (evenings and weekends), and distance/online learning for certain courses. The university have also announced a new multi million pound campus being planned for the Swansea marina. The new centre which will incorporate the majority of faculties based in Swansea and will be completed by the end of the decade.

Any accommodation? Yes. Prices in Swansea start from £63, Carmarthen are from £88 and Lampeter rents start from £68 a week.

Cheap to live there? Yes - privately rented rooms can be bagged for as little as £65 per week.

Transport links: At the end of the M4, so you can whiz back and forth to London. Carmarthen is 40 minutes down the dual carriageway to Fishguard and a ferry to Ireland. Regular trains to Carmarthen and Swansea, but Lampeter is a little more difficult to get to via public transport.

Fees: Welsh students pay £3,685 for a full-time undergraduate degree, due to Welsh Assembly grants, while students from the rest of the UK and EU pay £7,500. The university say the fee amount may change 'due to consultation currently ongoing.'

Bursaries: A number of scholarships of £500 are available for students studying specific subjects. There are also means-tested bursaries available for students from low-income families and Welsh language scholarships. For more information, visit the website.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: The students' union at Carmarthen has a nightclub called Unity and an Attic Bar. Trinity has its own theatre, used regularly by touring companies as well as for student productions. Try one of the 60 pubs or four nightclubs in Carmarthen too. Swansea is very lively, check out Wind Street, famous for its array of bars and so-called "super-clubs". Things in Lampeter are a bit more low-key, and students make their own entertainment. Aberystwyth is the nearest nightspot. The Old Bar is the main students' union drinking spot and puts on an eclectic mix of students nights, there is another nightclub in Lampeter, called Oxygen.

Glittering alumni: None as yet, but there's a host of big names that went to the university. Rugby stars Barry John and Carwyn James, and world famous tenor Stuart Burrows world famous tenor went to Trinity University College Carmarthen. As for Lampeter, its graduates include: Christopher Herbert, former Bishop of St Albans; opera guru and former BBC producer; writer Jack Higgins and Sulak Sivaraska, Thai human rights campaigner.

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