Warwick, University of

 

 

Overall ranking: Came 7th out of 123 in the Complete University Guide for 2015.

History: A 60s university built on a green-field site. Scorned by the left for its close links with industry but now lauded to the skies for its success in every sphere.

Address: Not actually in Warwick, the campus is about ten miles away from the town, sitting on the outskirts of Coventry, next to the town of Kenilworth.

Ambience: Very modern and sometimes impersonal campus; more than 720 acres of sixties-to-noughties architecture, man-made lakes and sculptures. Spent £25m on new accommodation buildings and £15m on a new mathematics building in the last few years.

Who's the boss? Professor Nigel Thrift, one of the world's leading human geographers and still an active researcher.

Prospectus: 02476 523 648 or order one here.

UCAS code: W20

What you need to know

Easy to get into? No. An A* grade is required by a small number of Warwick's undergrad courses. Physics asks for an A* and two As at A-level, including maths and physics. For the three-year law course, you'll need As plus a C in one other subject.

Vital statistics: Highly rated for research and teaching with a thriving science park and innovation centre. Includes a swanky business school and considers itself a research university: just over half of the 23,872 students are postgrads. Established a medical school in conjunction with Leicester University in 2000, before Warwick Medical School was awarded independent degree-awarding status in 2007. Its arts centre is the one of the largest in the UK. Warwick is one of 24 Russell Group universities, dedicated to the highest levels of academic excellence.

Added value: Hard-headed approach and links with industry have brought rewards. Research is done with industry: the Warwick Manufacturing Group alone has a turnover of £80m and works with hundreds of companies worldwide. Warwick generates more than 80% of its own income, which is over £450 million a year now. Work is set to begin on a new £100m National Innovation Campus, which will see over 900 staff from academic and industry trams from huge car companies to develop world-class breakthrough products. Current projects include a satellite designed and built by students set to be launched into space next year, and a new programme to transform social science teaching in the UK, helping provide the next generation of social scientists with the quantitative skills needed to evaluate evidence and analyse big data. It's not just in world-leading research and development that Warwick excels either- in 2007, Warwick students won University Challenge for the first time, but also held the world record for the largest number of people dressed as Smurfs. Beat that, Oxbridge.

Teaching: Ranked 59th out of 123 in the Complete University Guide.

Graduate prospects: Ranked 15th with 77.7 per cent finding graduate level employment.

Any accommodation? Over 6,380 bedrooms are offered on campus. Rents range between £81 and £160 per week, inclusive of all bills. There is also plenty of off-campus housing available.

Cheap to live there? Very much so, with private rents a snip from £60 to £80 per week.

Transport links: Close to the intersection of several motorways - the M6, M40, and M42. Two airports are nearby - Birmingham International and Coventry. Rapid train service from Coventry to London.

Fees: £9,000 per year for full-time home and EU undergrads starting in 2013. Fees for overseas undergrads start at £15,070.

Bursaries: Students coming from households with an income of less than £42,621 can get grants from £3,000 down to £500, depending on earnings. To see if you're eligible, click here.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: A big £11m extension to the Students' Union opened in 2010. There is now a multi-room nightclub complete with a chill-out bar that attracts A-list live acts. An enticing array of student nights vary from cheese at 'Pop' and eclectic indie at 'Electric City'. Coventry and Leamington Spa are nearby- try Evolve for chart, Smack for dubstep and Kasbah for a taste of Morocco.

Price of a pint: Pretty cheap at around £2.50.

Sporting reputation: Not bad at all- currently 20th in the BUCS league.

Calendar highlight: The Union run massive events throughout the year including the Warwick Student Arts Festival and several balls.

Notable societies: The Warwick Tricking and Freerunning (WTF) society is sure to attract the daredevils among you, with socials at least fortnightly. Doesn't sound like your thing? There's always the Glee group to hone your musical theatre skills...

Glittering alumni: Simon Mayo, radio presenter; Stephen Merchant, actor; Frank Skinner, comedian; David Davis, Conservative MP; Rosemary Thorne, finance director of Sainsbury's; Baroness Morris, former education minister; Baroness Amos, former leader of the House of Lords; Tim Mason, marketing director of Tesco; A.L Kennedy and Anne Fine, authors.

Alternative prospectus: Check out the Facebook group here.

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