York St John University

 

 

Overall ranking: 95th out of 123 in the Complete University Guide for 2015.

History: Born of a merger in 1975 between St John's College, York, and The College, Ripon, St John's first incarnation was in York in 1841, as the Church Training College for teachers. It was granted taught degree awarding powers in 2005 and university status in 2006.

Address: Lord Mayor's Walk, York.

Ambience: One of the country's newest universities - officially recognised in October 2006. The campus is an eight-acre site built around a quadrangle, situated in the heart of York, just outside the medieval city walls. Spectacular views of York Minster.

Who's the boss? Professor David Fleming, former deputy vice-chancellor at the University of Sunderland, is vice-chancellor.

Prospectus: 01904 876 598 or order one online here.

UCAS code: Y75

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Most undergraduate degree programmes require 280 UCAS points (the equivalent of BBC at A-level or DMM at BTEC) plus three GCSEs at grade C or above including English Language. Others are more competitive - the Primary Education course requires 300 UCAS points , five GCSEs at grade C or above and a minimum of 20 days experience within a relevant setting.

Vital statistics: Medium-sized institution with nearly 6,900 students studying degrees and other courses in teacher training, creative and performing arts, health and humanities. Popular subjects are sport, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, teaching, film and television. Nearly two thirds of students are female and nearly a third are over 21.

Added value: Millions have recently been invested in new buildings and in revamping its ivy-clad historic structures, providing disabled access. A new learning centre (a wired-up library that houses the Yorkshire Film Archive) and a sports science, psychology and health building both opened in September 2003. De Grey Court, a new £15.5m development, was completed in Autumn 2008 along with new self-catered student accommodation. York has many pubs, restaurants, theatres, galleries and an arts centre within easy access to the campus.

Teaching: 18th out of 123 for student satisfaction with teaching quality in the Complete University Guide.

Graduate prospects: 71st out of 123 with 61.1 per cent finding graduate level employment after completing their degrees.

Any accommodation? Yes. Accommodation is guaranteed for all first year students. Rent ranges from £90 and £153 for self-catered, and £138 to £164 a week for semi-catered. Over 800 rooms are en-suite.

Cheap to live there? About average. Private sector rents are around £70 to £90 per week in York. The university also has arrangements with local landlords offering accommodation.

Transport links: Good- only two hours to London by train. York is also easily accessible by rail from other cities including Leeds, Manchester, Birmingham, Newcastle and Edinburgh. Within York, the best way to get around is by foot or by bike.

Fees: £9,000 per year for full-time UK and EU undergraduates. International students pay £9,500.

Bursaries: Fee waivers of up to £3,000 per year are available for students from low income families. They offer the National Scholarship Programme too. See here for more information.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: A well-developed students' union means there’s plenty of entertainment for everybody. Venues for live bands and a variety of club nights are also found in York. Try Fibbers, The Duchess and Ziggy's.

Price of a pint: Around £3.50 on average, but Sam Smith's pubs offer cheaper beers.

Sporting reputation: Not the bottom of the table, but far from the top- 95th out of 145 universities and colleges in the 2013/14 BUCS league.

Notable societies: Aikido Club, to learn an unusual form of martial art, The Saint student magazine and even a new Tiddlywinks society with a city-wide tournament.

Glittering alumni: Geoff Cooke and Peter Squires, former England rugby internationals.

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