FROM OPPORTUNITY (A CAREERS MAGAZINE FOR BLACK AND MINORITY ETHNIC STUDENTS): AN INDEPENDENT PUBLISHING MAGAZINE

Teacher training: Start your studies earlier to get ahead

Studying teaching at undergraduate level will give you a great grounding in a career with direction and variety

Why is teaching such an attractive career? There are many reasons. The Graduate Career Survey rated pay as the top motivator for graduate career choices, and teaching is a career that pays well. From this September, newly qualified teachers will start on a salary in excess of £20,000, or more than £24,000 in inner London. This can rise to over £34,000 (or £40,000 in inner London) for good, experienced classroom teachers. For head teachers pay can rise to more than £90,000 - depending on the size of the school - and progression to headship can be swift.

Teaching is also well supported. Thorough training ensures teachers are fully prepared, with newly qualified teachers benefiting from mentors. Classroom assistants are widespread and all teachers have half a day a week out of the classroom for planning, preparation and assessment to reduce their workload. Subject associations and fellow teachers ensure that there is a substantial network that people can turn to.

If teaching is your career goal then you'll need a degree. First, however, you will need to have the equivalent of at least a C in GCSE maths and English. If you want to teach in a primary school or up to GCSE level in a secondary school, you will also need the equivalent of at least a C in a science subject. These are needed to teach and are in addition to any entry requirements for your degree course. The undergraduate route you can take into teaching is to do a degree that includes qualified teacher status (QTS) - the qualification needed to teach in a state school - such as a bachelor of education (BEd) or a BA or BSc with QTS.

A BSc or BA with QTS is a typical honours degree that also incorporates teacher training. As such, they include school-based training along with the more usual lectures and seminars and commonly last for four years. Because they lead to QTS, you must study a National Curriculum subject.

A BEd also leads to QTS but is an honours degree in education. The content may vary according to the university or college providing it, but they usually involve study of the history and theory of education, and can incorporate elements of sociology, philosophy, politics and psychology. Teaching and assessment also vary from institution to institution, but you can expect to learn from a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and school placements, assessed by essays and examinations, plus a dissertation in your final year.

Because they do not have a single-subject bias, BEds are a popular choice for people interested in teaching primary school children, but they are also an option for anyone wanting to teach at secondary level. For most BEd and BA or BSc with QTS courses starting in September or October, Ucas accepts applications between the preceding September and January. It is often also possible to apply to defer entry for a year.

In choosing their degree, most people consider what career they want after graduation, and one of the most popular choices among students is teaching. The 2006 UK Graduate Careers Survey found that more than one in 10 final-year students had either applied or were planning to apply to teacher-training courses, putting teaching second only to working in the media, and ahead of investment banking, marketing and accountancy. Perhaps that's something to learn from!

To find out more information about teaching and becoming a teacher, visit www.teach.gov.uk, the TDA's website. Alternatively, call the Teaching Information Line on 0845 6000 991 (0845 6000 992 for Welsh speakers; minicom 01245 454343)

CASE STUDY

Kelly Vidal, 21, is in the second year of her education and cultural studies course at Bath Spa University

I did English language, English literature and communication studies at A-level, and I also have an AS-level in media. This course will give me a broad grounding in the theory and practise of teaching before I begin my PGCE.

You do six modules a year, three in each semester. It's very practical: you get to go into classrooms and see how children learn. I'm doing a research-in-school module, which involves spending one day a week observing how classrooms and children work, and then writing up and presenting a paper.

We have a mixture of one-hour lectures and two-hour seminars; we're also encouraged to do as much reading around the subject as possible. There are no exams. It's all done through coursework, seminar presentation or work in schools. I'll also have to do a dissertation next year.

WEB WATCH

Teaching Times

Find out what teachers are talking about

www.teachingtimes.co.uk

Teacher Support Network

An independent charity that offers advice for teachers

www.teachersupport.info

Teaching English

Educational ideas from the British Council and the BBC

www.teachingenglish.org.uk

education.independent.co.uk/magazines

New Articles
tvDownton Abbey Christmas special
Arts and Entertainment
Wolf (Nathan McMullen), Ian (Dan Starky), The Doctor (Peter Capaldi), Clara (Jenna Coleman), Santa Claus (Nick Frost) in the Doctor Who Christmas Special (BBC/Photographer: David Venni)
tvOur review of the Doctor Who Christmas Special
News
peopleIt seems you can't silence Katie Hopkins, even on Christmas Day...
News
news
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Left to right: Stanley Tucci, Sophie Grabol and Christopher Eccleston in ‘Fortitude’
tvSo Sky Atlantic arrived in Iceland to film their new and supposedly snow-bound series 'Fortitude'...
Arts and Entertainment
Jenna Coleman as Clara Oswald in the Doctor Who Christmas special
tvForget the rumours that Clara Oswald would be quitting the Tardis
Arts and Entertainment
Japanese artist Megumi Igarashi showing a small mascot shaped like a vagina
art
News
The Queen delivers her Christmas message
newsTwitter reacts to Her Majesty's Christmas Message
Arts and Entertainment
tv
Life and Style
fashion
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Student

Ashdown Group: 1st Line IT Support - Surrey - £24,000

£20000 - £24000 per annum + training: Ashdown Group: Graduate IT Support Helpd...

Recruitment Genius: Graduate Audit Assistant

£19000 - £21000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Audit Graduate Opportunities ar...

Guru Careers: Graduate Marketing Analyst / Online Marketing Exec (SEO / PPC)

£18 - 24k (DOE): Guru Careers: A Graduate Marketing Analyst / Online Marketing...

FDM Group: Business and Technical IT Consultants – London, Manchester, Glasgow

21,000-24,000: FDM Group: Kick-start your career and join FDM’s award-winning ...

Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

A Christmas without hope: Fears grow in Gaza that the conflict with Israel will soon reignite

Christmas without hope

Gaza fears grow that conflict with Israel will soon reignite
After 150 years, you can finally visit the grisliest museum in the country

The 'Black Museum'

After 150 years, you can finally visit Britain's grisliest museum
No ho-ho-hos with Nick Frost's badass Santa

No ho-ho-hos with Nick Frost's badass Santa

Doctor Who Christmas Special TV review
Chilly Christmas: Swimmers take festive dip for charity

Chilly Christmas

Swimmers dive into freezing British waters for charity
Veterans' hostel 'overwhelmed by kindness' for festive dinner

Homeless Veterans appeal

In 2010, Sgt Gary Jamieson stepped on an IED in Afghanistan and lost his legs and an arm. He reveals what, and who, helped him to make a remarkable recovery
Isis in Iraq: Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment by militants

'Jilan killed herself in the bathroom. She cut her wrists and hanged herself'

Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment
Ed Balls interview: 'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'

Ed Balls interview

'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'
He's behind you, dude!

US stars in UK panto

From David Hasselhoff to Jerry Hall
Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz: What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?

Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz

What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?
Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Planet’s surface is inhospitable to humans but 30 miles above it is almost perfect
Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all