Pick up the phone yourself! Teenagers warned to keep pushy parents away from ringing universities to sort out clearing places

Allow parents to call sends wrong message about maturity

Education Editor

Would-be students have been told to keep pushy parents away from the telephone as they try to snap up university places after receiving their A-level results next week.

Headteachers have warned them: Don’t let them near the ‘phone - you’re on your own!

“Now is not the time to be nervous on the telephone and it’s certainly not the day for letting your parents fight your battles for you,” said Hilary French, president of the Girls’ School Association - which represents the country’s top independent girls’ schools.  “By all means discuss your options with them, but if you have to talk to universities you’re on your own.”

Clare Reseigh, head of sixth-form at St Gabriel’s School near Newbury, Berkshire, added:  “Under no circumstances allow your parents to call on your behalf because that will send entirely the wrong message about your maturity and commitment.”

The picture emerging next week when more than 250,000 teenagers get their A-level results is likely to remain unclear for university admissions for some time.

The likelihood is that there will be more places available through the clearing system as the Government has relaxed restrictions on recruitment - and is allowing universities to recruit as many students as they like provided they have at least an A and two B grade passes at A-level.

This means more leading universities - members of the Russell Group - will be seeking to top up numbers through clearing this year.

Overall, the latest figures from UCAS show that 637, 500 university applications have been received this year compared with 618, 250 the previous year - the first year of the new £9,000 a year fees regime.  This year’s figures, though, still lag behind 2011 - the peak year for applications as more students sought to beat the introduction of higher fees.

The GSA advised students who get better grades than expected that they could upgrade their courses as other applicants may have missed their grades and thus be unable to snap up places on sought after courses - such as law and medicine.

Jo Heywood, head of Heathfield School in Ascot, Surrey, suggested approaching a university where students had already been interviewed but not offered a place because of their predicted grades.

“They may remember you from interview if you performed well and now be pleased to offer you a place with your higher grades,” she added.

Caroline Jordan, head of Headington School in Oxford, said:  “IF you get ABB or higher but still fall short of your first choice offer, you may find that your university still offers you a place since the government cap is not operative for those who achieve these grades.”

Meanwhile, some overseas universities are extending their deadlines for recruiting students in the hope of snapping up applicants from the UK

HAN University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands, for instance has extended the deadline from June 1 to August 25 for students from the UK.

The University of Winnipeg in Canada now has multiple intakes in September, January and May which will help it accommodate UK students.

Suggested Topics
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Student

Ashdown Group: Trainee / Graduate Helpdesk Analyst

£20000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A highly reputable business is looking to rec...

Ashdown Group: Graduate Data Analyst - Essex - £25,000

£23500 - £25000 per annum + Training: Ashdown Group: Graduate Data analyst/Sys...

Recruitment Genius: Graduate Account Manager

£16000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Graduate Account Manager is r...

Guru Careers: Graduate Account Manager / Sales Executive

£18k + Uncapped Commission (£60k Y1 OTE): Guru Careers: A Graduate Account Man...

Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project