AMBA-ACCREDITED

ISEG School of Economics and Management, Technical University of Lisbon


Age: 98

History: Founded in 1913, its origins go back to the Commercial Lecture Hall, founded in 1759, later known as the School of Commerce. It's now one of the top management schools in Portugal, offering programmes at undergraduate, graduate and doctorate level.

Address: Rua do Quelhas, Lisbon, Portugal.

Ambience: Well located in downtown Lisbon, on the top of a hill facing the Tagus river and close to the Portuguese parliament. A recent renovation left it with top-quality facilities and a very modern campus, with wireless internet access and comfortable classrooms.

Vital statistics: The teaching faculty has more than 150 professors, and there are 3,000 undergraduate students and 1,000 graduates. The school became AMBA-accredited in 2007, adding to an earlier award by the AACSB.

Added value: Case studies and simulations dominate the heavily practical MBA programme, which has its own advisory board made up of several top Portuguese business gurus to ensure it moves with the times.

Easy to get into? Very competitive: a good academic and professional background, GMAT scores and proof of English proficiency are all required.

Glittering alumni: Many of the top Portuguese officials cut their teeth at ISEG.

Gurus: Guest speakers last year included Vitor Constâncio, former Chancellor of the Exchequer and Governor of the Bank of Portugal; Manuel Pinho, Minister of the Economy and Carlos Tavares, a former Minister of the Economy.

International connections: Works with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth in the US, as well as many other institutions all over Europe.

Teaching: Focuses on bridging the gap between theory and practice.

Student profile: Young professionals are usually interested in the MBA, and the majority of them have up to seven years of work experience.

Cost: Fees are €12,500.

Return on investment: A salary increase, better career prospects, and senior management positions.

Who’s the boss? João Duque ?is President and Professor of Finance of ISEG and Professor Jorge Landeiro de Vaz is the director of the MBA programme.

Prospectus: +351 21 392 2723; www.iseg.utl.pt; spg@iseg.utl.pt; gri@iseg.utl.pt

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