Leicester Business School, De Montfort University

 

Age: 111, 41 or 21, depending on how you count it.

History: De Montfort was conceived over a century ago, as a college of commerce to boost the local textile industry. It later morphed into a regional college of technology, then became Leicester Polytechnic and finally De Montfort University. Began running management courses more than 30 years ago.



Address: Leicester Business School's Graduate Centre is a purpose-built, ultra-modern affair opposite the university and overlooking the river Soar. The business school is moving to a new state of the art building, costing £35 million, which is due to open in Autumn 2009.



Ambience: The current £3.5 million Graduate Centre, which opened in 1999, gives students lots of space and excellent equipment. The ground floor has been designed to feel like a conference centre, with a 200-seat lecture theatre, five conference rooms, a syndicate area and a coffee bar.



Vital statistics: One of the largest business schools in the country, with 4,500 students and 150 academic staff.



Added value: Its academics are active researchers and consultants, and the school has strong links with major professional bodies. Instead of a traditional dissertation, MBA students can opt for a strategic management in-company project.



Easy to get into? Minimum requirements for the MBA are a good first degree or professional qualification, and at least three years' work experience at management level.



Glittering Professors: Monder Ram OBE, small and ethnic minority business; Vivien Lowndes, local government studies; Louise Fitzgerald, who was awarded a top USA Academy of Management award in 2006; David Wilson, public administration, Lawrence Pratchett, director of the local government research unit.



Teaching: The department of accounting and finance was awarded maximum commendation by the QAA in 2006.



International connections: On the full-time MBA, more than 90 per cent of students come from countries outside the UK and Europe, and 60 countries are represented within the teaching faculty.



Student profile: The average age on the executive MBA is 35, on the full-time it's 27. The male to female ratio is 65:35 on the executive, 70:30 on the full-time.



Cost: The full-time MBA is £6,950 for UK and EU students or £8,950 for overseas students. The executive option costs £3,950 every year for two years.



Return on investment? A salary hike of 60 per cent for part-timers.



Who's the boss? Professor David Wilson, dean of the faculty of business and law.



Prospectus: +44 (0)116 257 7230; dmu.ac.uk/business; pgbusiness@dmu.ac.uk

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