Postgraduate: Writing courses; Forensic computing; Inclusive design at the RCA

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The Independent Online

Creative writing courses at the University of East Anglia have fast-tracked novelists such as Ian McEwan and Trezza Azzopardi to the bestseller lists. Now, budding scriptwriters are getting a shot at the big time. Three students on the university's MA in scriptwriting and one graduate of the programme have been chosen to write scripts for ITV Anglia. The project was started by the TV company's controller, Neil Thompson, who wants to revive Anglia's reputation for drama, starting at grass-roots level (the East of England Development Agency has invested in the project). "We've got the best creative writing course in the country on our doorstep, so it makes sense to use that," says Anglia's Lisa Mungham-Gray.

Creative writing courses at the University of East Anglia have fast-tracked novelists such as Ian McEwan and Trezza Azzopardi to the bestseller lists. Now, budding scriptwriters are getting a shot at the big time. Three students on the university's MA in scriptwriting and one graduate of the programme have been chosen to write scripts for ITV Anglia. The project was started by the TV company's controller, Neil Thompson, who wants to revive Anglia's reputation for drama, starting at grass-roots level (the East of England Development Agency has invested in the project). "We've got the best creative writing course in the country on our doorstep, so it makes sense to use that," says Anglia's Lisa Mungham-Gray. The four taking part include 22-year-old Asheem Singh, an Oxford graduate who obtained the best A-level results in the UK in his year, and Kim Upton, 40, an accountant and a mother of three boys. The writers, working in two pairs, are producing two half-hour dramas to be shown in the Anglia region. They will be working in an American style, with one writer developing the lead character and the other creating circumstances for the character to react to. The plots will be relevant to the region. One is likely to feature a tense relationship between a tenant farmer and his daughter. Professional, local actors will be cast, and it is planned that they will be consulted on the development of the stories. The audience reaction to the dramas will be gauged in a studio discussion programme. If the verdict is favourable, a series could follow.

¿ E-mail scams and hacking are to be studied on a new course. The MSc in forensic computing at Bradford University will teach students the investigation and analysis techniques needed to find legal evidence of computer crimes. "They will be looking at a wide range of illegal activities including theft of trade secrets, theft or destruction of intellectual property, and fraud," says the course tutor, Dr Anastasia Konstadopoulou. Jobs in the field are being created in law enforcement agencies, financial institutions and security consultancies. The course is suitable for graduates or professionals with good UK undergraduate degrees in computing or engineering. Modules will include computer operating systems, cryptography, e-commerce and expert witness skills. For more details, call 01274 233081 or e-mail course-enquiries@bradford.ac.uk

¿ Jewellery that can hold pills, a mobile school locker that turns into a desk and an optical system to reduce claustrophobia during MRI scans are among new designs by students at the Royal College of Art. The creations have won awards from the college's Helen Hamlyn Research Centre, which promotes "inclusive design".

CORRECTION: We stated last week that City University's Legal Practice Course (LPC) was the only one in London with an excellent rating from the Law Society. In fact, the commercial provider BPP's LPC also carries this distinction

g.mccann@independent.co.uk

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