The ITV studio in central Warsaw

ITV's awkward away fixture is still one up on the BBC

Football tragics have now had five days of post-5pm football saturation. And, while Andriy Shevchenko's rebirth and Spain's lack of a striker are to the fore, those with an eye for interior design have been focused on one other thing – namely ITV's studio set, currently floating David Blaine-like above Castle Square in central Warsaw.

Frank Skinner in the pool

The lengths (and widths) they go to... Frank Skinner dives in

Comedian overcomes his fear of swimming to complete a length for Sport Relief

BBC pays £22m to 19 stars

The number of top talent earning more than £100,000 a year at the BBC has gone up, according to its accounts which were released today.

Media Diary: Ex-Treme case of Anglophobia

Sky Atlantic

Treme, the New Orleans-based Sky Atlantic drama from David Simon (creator of The Wire), provides great insight into the culture of a great city.

James Lawton: If Lièvremont hates the English, is it because he fears humiliation for France in World Cup year?

A number of hard questions will be asked at Twickenham this evening, not least at the front of the scrum, but let's start at the beginning.

Cooper Brown: The Zoo

Bad news – it turns out Victoria’s Australian nanny, the one who got dumped by the Greek guy by text, flew back to Oz today. Victoria rang me up and she’s all sobbing and I immediately think that something has happened to H-F?

Cooper Brown: At home

At home in the Cooperdome all day as Victoria is off looking at premises for her new store. This meant that me and H-F were alone together for the whole day – the first time in months.

Tings is good for Rastamouse, the TV cult hero

He’s the skate-boarding, Rastafarian felt mouse who solves crimes with a chilled-out mantra of “makin’ a bad ting good”. Yet it's parents and students who are helping to turn Rastamouse into the biggest childrens’ television cult hit since Teletubbies.

Anthony Rose: 'When it comes to matters of taste it’s a false economy not to take the upshift challenge'

I was watching the downshift challenge on Daybreak TV recently (don't ask). Drop one brand level lower and you can save 40 per cent, claimed Martin Lewis, because people are fooled at Christmas into thinking they must have the best. He tried out two Christmas trees on children, one cheerful, the other deeply depressing. The suggestion that the depressing cheaper one was better because it was cheaper lacked conviction. He then road-tested a Christmas pudding and mince pie on a blindfolded Adrian Chiles who guessed both the more expensive ones correctly. Which suggests that while it may be worth saving on basic brands, when it comes to matters of taste, wine in particular, it's a false economy not to take the upshift challenge and enhance the enjoyment.

Natalie Haynes: Birmingham: more gastric band than Bull Ring

This week saw the release of figures from the Public Health Observatories which concluded that Birmingham is the fattest city in Europe. Some 29 per cent of adults in the city are obese, which is more than twice the European average. And the prospects don't look good for the next generation either: 25 per cent of 11- and 12-year-olds in the city are obese too.

Sunday show for Chiles

Adrian Chiles is to present a new Sunday night talk show with regular guests including the former deputy prime minister John Prescott, musician Shaun Ryder and football manager Harry Redknapp.

Brian Viner: The rise and rise of pismronunciation

Not since my schooldays, when a boy in my year called Ian Hunt was cruelly nicknamed Isaac, even by some of the teachers, has the surname of the current Culture Secretary struck me as potentially comical. So three cheers for Jim Naughtie, whose now-celebrated clanger on Monday's Today programme unwittingly kindled the schoolboy humour that brought some warmth to a freezing winter's day.

Daybreak draws a million viewers

ITV1 morning show Daybreak has bounced back by drawing a million viewers for the first time since its launch week.

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