Arts and Entertainment Mr angry Trent Reznor of industrial rock veterans Nine Inch Nails

The Nine Inch Nails frontman is still furious after all these years. But, at 78, Leonard Cohen knows it's better to be a lover than a fighter

Album: The 1975, The 1975 (Dirty Hit)

Manchester indie quartet The 1975 formed because they realised that making music was "better than going to work".

The big fashion cover-up: Coats

Make hay while the sun shines but remember cold weather is closer than you think. Now’s the time to invest, says Rebecca Gonsalves

Alex Kapranos, Franz’s perfectly preserved frontman

Music review: Why Franz Ferdinand are still the best

Art-pop kings remind the world why they rank among this century’s finest songwriters with a truly scintillating comeback gig

Ben Howard at the Green Man Festival

Green Man Festival review: Headliners Kings of Convenience and Ben Howard were the weakest aspects

The Green Man festival’s Brecon Beacons setting regularly startles with its beauty. The Black Mountains – more like lush green hills – and open sky which tower over its stages don’t dwarf the performers, instead making them feel part of something bigger. A diverse bill leaning towards folk and Americana often rises to the landscape’s challenge.

Album: Dawes, Stories Don't End (Mercury/Hub)

Album three from the LA four-piece whose Nothing is Wrong was one of my favourite records of 2011.

Jello Biafra

Simon Price on pop: Jello Biafra and the Guantanamo School of Medicine: If you missed punk's first two waves, it's back - and it's fracking furious

What a difference an apostrophe makes. Punks in Camden Lock. Any year you choose, from 1986.

1977: British pop punk group The Stranglers at the start of their controversial recording career. From left to right, Hugh Cornwell, Jet Black, Jean Jacques Burnel and Dave Greenfield.

Punk gets fusty? The Stranglers bassist Jean-Jacques Burnel embraces monarchy and the Daily Telegraph

He’s the snarling bassist in The Stranglers, punk’s most malevolent survivors, famed for beating up rival bands, fans and each other. But Jean-Jacques Burnel has revealed that he is now a Daily Telegraph-reading advocate for Britain’s constitutional monarchy.

Album: Medicine, To The Happy Few (Captured Tracks)

A big legend in small circles, Medicine were the first American band signed to Creation Records and were, according to Planet Pitchfork, 'the American answer to My Bloody Valentine'.

Big wheel: Henry Ford’s Model T was built in Detroit and helped make the city a symbol of US wealth

Ben Ross: Will bankrupt Detroit lure tourists back one day?

I arrived in Detroit ready to roll, ready to rock. At last I was in Henry Ford's Motor City, where he conceived the Model T, the vehicle that made modern America. Finally, I was in the place where Motown was born, where Berry Gordy built a musical dynasty: Diana Ross and the Supremes, Smokey Robinson, the Jackson 5. For me, Detroit was iconic, a symbol of America in its mid-20th-century pomp.

Neil Hannon: 'I settled on Nile Rodgers; he's the coolest man alive, really...'

Fantasy band: Neil Hannon, The Duckworth Lewis Method

'I settled on Nile Rodgers; he's the coolest man alive, really...'

The Pipedream Skookum 29er Titanium is designed to hammer down muddy paths

Cycling review: Pipedream Skookum 29er Titanium

'Built for muddy trails, perfect for tackling potholes'

Album review: Rodrigo Leão, Songs (2004-2012) (Glitterhouse)

Since leaving the group Madredeus, Portuguese composer Rodrigo Leão has let his muse drift between rock, classical and movie music, all areas feeding into this latest album which features guest vocalists fronting his jazz-pop arrangements.

One to watch: Rainy Milo, singer, 17

One to watch: Rainy Milo, singer, 17

Is this the new Neneh Cherry? Gilles Peterson snapped up her soulful pop song “'Bout You” which she had posted online for his compilation CD.

Album review: Editors, The Weight of Your Love ([P.I.A.S.])

Having made progress of sorts with 2009's In This Light and on This Evening, Editors here step backwards into the crepuscular netherworld of Eighties new wave from whence they took their original inspiration.

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NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own