Arts and Entertainment Mr angry Trent Reznor of industrial rock veterans Nine Inch Nails

The Nine Inch Nails frontman is still furious after all these years. But, at 78, Leonard Cohen knows it's better to be a lover than a fighter

Album: The 1975, The 1975 (Dirty Hit)

Manchester indie quartet The 1975 formed because they realised that making music was "better than going to work".

The big fashion cover-up: Coats

Make hay while the sun shines but remember cold weather is closer than you think. Now’s the time to invest, says Rebecca Gonsalves

Alex Kapranos, Franz’s perfectly preserved frontman

Music review: Why Franz Ferdinand are still the best

Art-pop kings remind the world why they rank among this century’s finest songwriters with a truly scintillating comeback gig

Ben Howard at the Green Man Festival

Green Man Festival review: Headliners Kings of Convenience and Ben Howard were the weakest aspects

The Green Man festival’s Brecon Beacons setting regularly startles with its beauty. The Black Mountains – more like lush green hills – and open sky which tower over its stages don’t dwarf the performers, instead making them feel part of something bigger. A diverse bill leaning towards folk and Americana often rises to the landscape’s challenge.

Album: Dawes, Stories Don't End (Mercury/Hub)

Album three from the LA four-piece whose Nothing is Wrong was one of my favourite records of 2011.

Jello Biafra

Simon Price on pop: Jello Biafra and the Guantanamo School of Medicine: If you missed punk's first two waves, it's back - and it's fracking furious

What a difference an apostrophe makes. Punks in Camden Lock. Any year you choose, from 1986.

1977: British pop punk group The Stranglers at the start of their controversial recording career. From left to right, Hugh Cornwell, Jet Black, Jean Jacques Burnel and Dave Greenfield.

Punk gets fusty? The Stranglers bassist Jean-Jacques Burnel embraces monarchy and the Daily Telegraph

He’s the snarling bassist in The Stranglers, punk’s most malevolent survivors, famed for beating up rival bands, fans and each other. But Jean-Jacques Burnel has revealed that he is now a Daily Telegraph-reading advocate for Britain’s constitutional monarchy.

Album: Medicine, To The Happy Few (Captured Tracks)

A big legend in small circles, Medicine were the first American band signed to Creation Records and were, according to Planet Pitchfork, 'the American answer to My Bloody Valentine'.

Big wheel: Henry Ford’s Model T was built in Detroit and helped make the city a symbol of US wealth

Ben Ross: Will bankrupt Detroit lure tourists back one day?

I arrived in Detroit ready to roll, ready to rock. At last I was in Henry Ford's Motor City, where he conceived the Model T, the vehicle that made modern America. Finally, I was in the place where Motown was born, where Berry Gordy built a musical dynasty: Diana Ross and the Supremes, Smokey Robinson, the Jackson 5. For me, Detroit was iconic, a symbol of America in its mid-20th-century pomp.

Neil Hannon: 'I settled on Nile Rodgers; he's the coolest man alive, really...'

Fantasy band: Neil Hannon, The Duckworth Lewis Method

'I settled on Nile Rodgers; he's the coolest man alive, really...'

The Pipedream Skookum 29er Titanium is designed to hammer down muddy paths

Cycling review: Pipedream Skookum 29er Titanium

'Built for muddy trails, perfect for tackling potholes'

Album review: Rodrigo Leão, Songs (2004-2012) (Glitterhouse)

Since leaving the group Madredeus, Portuguese composer Rodrigo Leão has let his muse drift between rock, classical and movie music, all areas feeding into this latest album which features guest vocalists fronting his jazz-pop arrangements.

One to watch: Rainy Milo, singer, 17

One to watch: Rainy Milo, singer, 17

Is this the new Neneh Cherry? Gilles Peterson snapped up her soulful pop song “'Bout You” which she had posted online for his compilation CD.

Album review: Editors, The Weight of Your Love ([P.I.A.S.])

Having made progress of sorts with 2009's In This Light and on This Evening, Editors here step backwards into the crepuscular netherworld of Eighties new wave from whence they took their original inspiration.

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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – Five-star MS Swiss Corona 7 nights from £999pp
Lake Como St Moritz & the Bernina Express 7 nights from £809pp
Vietnam
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Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all
The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

Sony suffered a chorus of disapproval after it withdrew 'The Interview', but it's not too late for it to take a stand, says Joan Smith
From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?

Panto dames: before and after

From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?
Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Booksellers say readers are turning away from dark modern thrillers and back to the golden age of crime writing
Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best,' says founder of JustGiving

Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best'

Ten million of us have used the JustGiving website to donate to good causes. Its co-founder says that being dynamic is as important as being kind
The botanist who hunts for giant trees at Kew Gardens

The man who hunts giants

A Kew Gardens botanist has found 25 new large tree species - and he's sure there are more out there
The 12 ways of Christmas: Spare a thought for those who will be working to keep others safe during the festive season

The 12 ways of Christmas

We speak to a dozen people who will be working to keep others safe, happy and healthy over the holidays
Birdwatching men have a lot in common with their feathered friends, new study shows

The male exhibits strange behaviour

A new study shows that birdwatching men have a lot in common with their feathered friends...
Diaries of Evelyn Waugh, Virginia Woolf and Noël Coward reveal how they coped with the December blues

Famous diaries: Christmas week in history

Noël Coward parties into the night, Alan Clark bemoans the cost of servants, Evelyn Waugh ponders his drinking…
From noble to narky, the fall of the open letter

From noble to narky, the fall of the open letter

The great tradition of St Paul and Zola reached its nadir with a hungry worker's rant to Russell Brand, says DJ Taylor
A Christmas ghost story by Alison Moore: A prodigal daughter has a breakthrough

A Christmas ghost story by Alison Moore

The story was published earlier this month in 'Poor Souls' Light: Seven Curious Tales'