Portobello House Hotel Bistro, 225 Ladbroke Grove, London W10

Ladbroke Grove is a history lesson in brick and concrete. It was the core of the Ladbroke Estate, an explosion of posh properties built in the 1840s after the Hippodrome Racecourse, north of Portobello Road, failed to attract punters and closed down. The classy gardens, squares, villas and crescents of 'Leafy Ladbroke' came to rival the stylish Whig mansions of Holland Park to the south. Unfortunately, on the north side, the demand for house-building for wealthy Victorians dwindled, then stopped, in the 1860s. It was a project which just ran out of money.

Ousted Yemeni leader Saleh to seek exile in Ethiopia

The ousted Yemeni leader, Ali Abdullah Saleh, plans to go into exile in Ethiopia, his aides said yesterday, as the newly inaugurated leader, Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, took over from his predecessor of 33 years.

Dries Van Noten: 'There's too much fashion'

Too many shows, too many collections, and, simply, too many clothes... So says Dries Van Noten, a designer who has never bowed to convention. Susannah Frankel meets Antwerp's most stylish export.

BBC accused of putting antiques before ambition

Shows about antiques and curios have become so commonplace on BBC television that they are making rare artifacts of the few programmes of genuine originality and ambition that remain in the daytime schedule.

What is the future for Britain’s antiques trade?

Last year, just weeks after celebrating the 75th annual Grosvenor House Art & Antiques Fair in June 2009, the organisers announced it was to close for good, citing declining profit, increased costs and demands on the space for closure.

The 50 best Antiques shops

Whether you’re after fantastic furniture or perfect paintings, Kate Watson-Smyth offers the experts’ guide to affordable auctions and sky’s-the-limit galleries

Is car boot discovery a Knights Templar relic?

It sounds like Cash in the Attic meets the The Da Vinci Code. A pile of junk cleared from a country home finds its way to a car boot sale in a nearby market town. Among the detritus is a small piece of wood measuring just 10 inches by four inches and covered with painted figures.

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Peter Coke: Voice of radio sleuth Paul Temple

To the 1940s baby boomers – those born in the six years from 1944 to 1950 and brought up on a strict diet of the Home Service and the Light Programme on the wireless during the 1950s and the 1960s – certain radio voices will never be surpassed, or even matched. Holmes and Watson will forever be Carleton Hobbs and Norman Shelley; the Mayor of Toytown will be Felix Felton; Jeeves and Wooster are Richard Briers and Michael Hordern; and Paul Temple, Francis Durbridge's radio sleuth, will always be, incontestably, Peter Coke.