Arts and Entertainment Face facts: ‘Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World’ with Dr Jago Cooper

When most of us think of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, we think of moai, the 887 magnificent statues that guard its shores. But the mystery of BBC4's Easter Island: Mysteries of a Lost World wasn't how these monoliths were made, or how they were moved into place (aliens, obviously) or even whether the ancient Rapa Nui people were responsible for their own decline, it's why the myths have persisted for so long.

A picture shows the Qesem Cave excavation site where the campfire was discovered.

300,000-year-old firepit found in Israel could be the first example of a social campfire

The fire-pit found near Tel-Aviv could hold the secret to the beginnings of social culture among early humans

Govan Stones: Historic Hogback Stone leaves Scotland for first time in 1,100 years to go on display at British Museum

One of the most important relics of indigenous Viking culture will leave Scotland for the first time in its 1,100 year history to go on display at the British Museum this week.

The disputed objects were largely ancient Etruscan treasures, similar to this one - an Etruscan black-figured amphora depicting the death of Medusa - on display in Rome's Qurinale Presidential Palace

Italy threatens legal action after British Government refuses to return artefacts seized from disgraced London art dealer

Sculptures of marble heads, a bronze bust of Alexander the Great and bronze statuettes of the gods form part of the collection

King Senebkay's tomb and its surrounding area at the Abydos site

Valley of the other kings: Lost dynasty found in Egypt

Archaeologists have unearthed an ancient cemetery thought to contain the tombs of 16 pharaohs

Amateur treasure hunters uncovered more than 73,000 archaeological finds in 2013

Notable hauls include a rare hoard of Anglo-Saxon coins

City of London's grisly decapitated skull mystery solved using state-of-the-art forensic techniques

Archaeologists are thrilled at the blood-thirsty findings

King Tutankhamun was buried with an upright penis in order to portray him as Osiris, the ancient Egyptian god of the afterlife, new research suggests

King Tutankhamun was mummified with an erect penis to 'quash religious revolution'

The ancient Egyptian pharaoh was buried with an erect penis, no heart and covered in black oils to make him appear as the god Osiris, new study claims

King Arthur Pendragon changed his name by deed poll after he was told that he embodied the legendary monarch's spirit

Druids take up arms over display of bones at Stonehenge

King Arthur Pendragon says 'the spirit of Arthur has returned to have the ancients reinterred at Stonehenge'

5,000 years of scrounging: Scientists discover world’s earliest evidence of cats living off humans

New study reveals proof for first time of how cats became ‘domesticated’

History man: Arthur Pendragon at Stonehenge, which is opening a new visitor centre

Stonehenge: Two tribes go to war – over bones

Druids and archaeologists battle it out at Stonehenge’s new £27m centre

The skeleton was found in a crouched or foetal position, possibly mirroring birth

Ancient skeleton found during North Yorkshire sewer improvements

Contractors have stumbled upon an ancient skeleton while digging a sewer trench in Norton-on-Derwent, near Malton. The skeleton is thought to be of either Roman or pre-historic origin.

Bletchley Park

Remains of two of Bletchley Park's earliest World War Two buildings are discovered

The brick footings of two huts were revealed as workmen were digging up one of the former code-breaking centre's car parks

interior of the Maya Devi Temple in Lumbini

Unearthed: the shrine set to revolutionise world view of Buddha's origins

Archaeologists digging beneath sacred Maya Devi Temple find first physical evidence to enable them to accurately date the nativity of Prince Siddhartha Gautama

Paperback review: Time's Anvil, By Richard Morris

“One thing we bring to time,” writes archaeologist Richard Morris in this multi-levelled book about digging up the English past, “is a compulsion to split it up”.

Dr Zahi Hawass with Beyoncé during the singer's visit to the pyramids earlier this month

'Rude' Beyoncé banned from Pyramids by 'Egypt's Indiana Jones'

The controversial archaeologist Zahi Hawass reveals how her lateness led to upset

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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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'It was first time I had ever tasted chocolate. I kept a piece, and when Amsterdam was liberated, I gave it to the first Allied soldier I saw'

Bread from heaven

Dutch survivors thank RAF for World War II drop that saved millions
Britain will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power - Labour

How 'the Axe' helped Labour

UK will be 'run for the wealthy and powerful' if Tories retain power
Rare and exclusive video shows the horrific price paid by activists for challenging the rule of jihadist extremists in Syria

The price to be paid for challenging the rule of extremists

A revolution now 'consuming its own children'
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Welcome to the world of Megagames

300 players take part in Watch the Skies! board game in London
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Charlotte Gainsbourg on 'Nymphomaniac'

Starring in one of the most explicit films ever
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers

Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi

The Emirates' out-of-sight migrant workers helping to build the dream projects of its rulers
Vince Cable interview: Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'

Vince Cable exclusive interview

Charging fees for employment tribunals was 'a very bad move'
Iwan Rheon interview: Game of Thrones star returns to his Welsh roots to record debut album

Iwan Rheon is returning to his Welsh roots

Rheon is best known for his role as the Bastard of Bolton. It's gruelling playing a sadistic torturer, he tells Craig McLean, but it hasn't stopped him recording an album of Welsh psychedelia
Russell Brand's interview with Ed Miliband has got everyone talking about The Trews

Everyone is talking about The Trews

Russell Brand's 'true news' videos attract millions of viewers. But today's 'Milibrand' interview introduced his resolutely amateurish style to a whole new crowd
Morne Hardenberg interview: Cameraman for BBC's upcoming show Shark on filming the ocean's most dangerous predator

It's time for my close-up

Meet the man who films great whites for a living
Increasing numbers of homeless people in America keep their mobile phones on the streets

Homeless people keep mobile phones

A homeless person with a smartphone is a common sight in the US. And that's creating a network where the 'hobo' community can share information - and fight stigma - like never before
'Queer saint' Peter Watson left his mark on British culture by bankrolling artworld giants

'Queer saint' who bankrolled artworld giants

British culture owes a huge debt to Peter Watson, says Michael Prodger
Pushkin Prizes: Unusual exchange programme aims to bring countries together through culture

Pushkin Prizes brings countries together

Ten Scottish schoolchildren and their Russian peers attended a creative writing workshop in the Highlands this week
14 best kids' hoodies

14 best kids' hoodies

Don't get caught out by that wind on the beach. Zip them up in a lightweight top to see them through summer to autumn
Robert Fisk in Abu Dhabi: The acceptable face of the Emirates

The acceptable face of the Emirates

Has Abu Dhabi found a way to blend petrodollars with principles, asks Robert Fisk