Travel Me casa, su casa: the breakfast room

A creative, globe-trotting couple have put their stamp on a pair of 1920s buildings in Barrio Italia. By Sorrel Moseley-Williams

Brit art: In the Golden Days by John Strudwick

Move over Impressionism…the British are (finally) coming

France doesn’t have much time for British 19th century art, so the exhibition now on in Paris is a big risk

Young at heart: 'Creative Family Home' shows how to let your childrens' imaginations run free at home

As easy as child’s play

A new interiors bible shows that family life doesn’t have to mean an end to good design. By Trish Lorenz

Nina Felix by Bob Dylan, 2013

Bob Dylan's artwork enters hallowed halls of National Portrait Gallery (despite being 'amalgamations' not portraits)

Bob Dylan may have earned himself a host of complimentary descriptions from “poet of our time” to “lyrical genius”. But the 110 million album-selling folk musician has been battling to be taken seriously as a visual artist for almost as long as he has been singing songs, and now 12 of his artworks are set to enter the National Portrait Gallery - the first time he has exhibited in a public museum in the UK.

Statue of the Dead Christ c.1500-1520: The damaged statue of Christ that lay hidden for hundreds of years will form the centrepiece of a new exhibition of attacked art at Tate Modern.

Iconoclasm: Tate Britain to showcase art that has been blown up, defaced, dyed and mutilated

The first exhibition exploring the history of British iconoclasm opens in October

For richer, for poorer: The Football Match (1949) sold for £5.6m in 2011

Charles Darwent on Lowry and The Painting of Modern Life at Tate Britain: The matchstick men aren’t quite where Lowry left them

L S Lowry turned the working class into a flat-capped mob, always on the move, never getting anywhere

Undiscovered LS Lowry work found on the back of painting ahead of Tate show

An undiscovered work by LS Lowry has been unearthed by astonished curators hanging Tate Britain's new blockbuster retrospective of the "matchstick men" painter.

The Maldive Exodus Caravan Show

Political turmoil in the Maldives reverberates all the way to the Venice Biennale 2013

The political turmoil rocking the Maldives has reverberated all the way to Venice’s celebrated art show where the archipelago nation is represented by two exhibitions – an official one focussing on the danger of climate change and unofficial show highlighting political repression.

Through their eyes: Children who fled the violence draw picture of Syria crisis

A Unicef worker reports from Northern Iraq on the challenges of rehabilitation

Falkland Holdings boosted by UK exhibitions

The company which owns much of the Falkland Islands' infrastructure and a stake in an oil explorer there beat the City's predictions for its profits thanks to an unlikely source.

Vive le school run: Children's journeys to school in rural Brittany are packed with mini-adventures

In rural Brittany, children travel by boat, bike or walk through woods to get to school. Photographer Stéphanie Tétu captured their adventures.

Pay a visit to the Bruno and Bean pop-up shop and pick up new pieces. Palladian tea cup and saucer by Custhom, from £24. brunoandbean.com

iStyle: Capital ideas

Who needs to fly off to Milan? Clerkenwell Design Week is a fabulous showcase for British design talent, says Trish Lorenz

Dr Simon Pennell, palliative care doctor at Lewis Manning Hospice in Dorset (Rankin Photography Ltd)

Rankin honours parents with pictures of life before death

Rankin, the celebrated photographer, is on a mission to bring death to life in an exhibition inspired by the trauma he suffered after his parents died within weeks of each other.

Up in the air: Marc Chagall’s Paris Through the Window (1913) will be at Tate Liverpool for four months

Heads Up: Chagall, Modern Master

Things are looking up – the first Chagall UK show in 15 years

An ambulance in France

French cancer patient saves paramedic after heart attack

After his story makes the national news, Christian Nayet insists his actions were 'human, not courageous.'

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent