News

Just over six months after it was resurrected by German investors, online technology magazine The Kernel could be set to disappear once again after being swallowed up by a US rival.

The town on the wrong side of America's drugs war

A huge fence runs thousands of miles along the border with Mexico to keep migrants and narcotics out. Trouble is, it also cuts off half of Brownsville, Texas.

This is the way to Amarillo

Andrew Gumbel turns off the Texas highway and finds that the town celebrated in song by Tony Christie - and now Peter Kay - is friendly, but bemused by its fame in Britain

Cycling: Armstrong in saddle for magnificent seven chase

There has been months of speculation, countless hours of website debate and considerable uncertainty as to what his final decision would be, but Lance Armstrong has, at long last, confirmed that he will definitely be taking part in the 2005 Tour de France.

Is nothing sacred?

It's the holiest of Christian sites - the place where Jesus was buried. But the Church of the Holy Sepulchre has become a battleground where priests fight and monks stone each other. Victoria Clark reports on an ungodly turf war

Central Park becomes one giant saffron celebration as Christo's Gates unfurl

A former governor of Texas, recognisable from her bouffant white hair, was standing at the core of a crowd of hundreds at the 72nd Street entrance on the east side of Central Park before breakfast yesterday. The politician was not the attraction, however. Everyone was there for the art.

Abu Ghraib abuse ringleader found guilty

The army reservist found guilty of abusing prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq said at his sentencing hearing yesterday that he was merely following orders. The soldier, Specialist Charles Graner, received a 10-year sentence after being convicted on 10 counts of prisoner abuse at the end of a four-day trial in Texas.

Company involved in CSA computer snags to get new contract

The Texan company involved in the computer problems at the Child Support Agency (CSA) is set to win a big new contract to improve productivity at the same organisation, according to a confidential document seen by The Independent.

Woman pays £26,000 to clone her dead cat

A Texas woman is thought to be the first person to have a pet cloned to order.

Arthur Lydiard

Running coach who was the true inventor of jogging

Dan Rather, the news anchor who lasted a quarter century, to retire

Dan Rather, the CBS news anchor embroiled in the scandal over faked documents related to President George Bush's Vietnam-era service in the National Guard, is stepping down at the end of March, the network said last night.

'Nuclear option' threat to EDS as it races to sort out Child Support Agency fiasco

Minister considers withholding further payments if computer giant can't fix £456m IT systems, writes Clayton Hirst

Bush: 'I've got the energy, the optimism and the enthusiasm to cross the finishing line'

Four years ago when George Bush was the governor of Texas he spent election day in Austin, awaiting the outcome in the governor's mansion. Yesterday, as the incumbent President, he left his Texas ranch in Crawford to return to Washington and wait in the White House for the political endgame to play out.

Racing: Lone Star trip just right for Ouija Board

Texas is bigger than England and France put together, but they have not used much of it to construct Lone Star Park which stages the Breeders' Cup for the first time today.

Racing: Europeans fear the Texan turns

The Breeders' Cup taskforce of Britain and Europe will try out the track here at Lone Star Park for the first time this morning and, climactically, it may not be the shocking experience many had predicted.

Turner shortlist sees artists turn political

The artists shortlisted for this year's £25,000 Turner Prize have unveiled the most political exhibition of works for years, including a reconstruction of Osama bin Laden's former home in Afghanistan and an insight into George Bush's home town in Texas.

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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us