Life and Style

It probably contravenes some unwritten rule to begin a light-hearted examination of the week in technology with a reference to Jimmy Savile, but a few days ago I remembered an episode of Jim'll Fix It in the 1980s where some lucky youngster had his room kitted out with all the latest gadgets from the Ideal Home Show, including some automated curtains. These curtains elicited gasps of wonder from my teenage self as I entertained the notion that, in the future, we'd be relieved of the endless, life-sapping drudgery of having to drag light pieces of material along a rail, sometimes as frequently as twice a day.

GTA 5: Rockstar bans gamers stealing in-game money worth millions

An alternate game world dubbed the 'cheater's pool' has been created for infringing players, but stats show that cheaters have accumulated trillions in in-game currency

Nearly two thirds of global web activity is thanks to bots, say study

Increasing levels of non-human activity reflects a rise in automated web services that collect data for us - as well as an influx of more sophisticated hackers

Defibrillator iPhone app launched to help locate life saving first aid equipment

iPhone and iPad app locates nearest defibrillator for people suffering cardiac arrest

Brewbot lets you brew beers with your iPhone

Automated machine lets you feed in the ingredients, set a timer and wait for your home-brewed beers

Google say the scanning of emails is common industry practice

Google: Gmail users can’t expect privacy when sending emails

A lawsuit says the tech giant is breaking the law when it scans emails to target adverts to users

Cyber Culture: Sorry TomTom, I would like to update you, but I can't be bothered

Last week, my TomTom satnav app kept trying to send me the wrong way down a one-way street in Peckham, south London. This was mildly annoying – although fortunately I've got sufficient sense of direction to successfully execute emergency procedures.

Department for Work and Pensions forced to spend £1m on extra staff after IT delay

More than 100 civil servants will have to be employed to manually verify whether people should be hit by the new benefit cap, because of delays to the Government’s IT system for its welfare reform programme.

The Royston ruling could have wider implications on the use of number-plate tracking in other parts of the country

The Royston ring of steel: Data watchdog warns police that surveillance scheme in rural Hertfordshire town is 'unlawful'

Monitoring of car number plates by CCTV cameras is ‘excessive’,  rules data Information Commissioner's Office

Liu Yipeng was a classmate of the two earlier victims

Chinese schoolgirl, 15, named as third victim of Asiana runway crash

The third person to die from injuries sustained when an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 crashed in San Francisco has been identified as a 15-year-old classmate of the two earlier victims.

Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 is engulfed on the tarmac after crash landing at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, California

Asiana Airline pilots 'stayed silent until two seconds before crash' at San Francisco airport

Lee Hang-kook and co-pilot did not say a word to one another until shortly before plane's tail section clipped the seawall at the end of the runway

Album review: Buika, La Noche Más Larga (Chusma)

The Mallorcan singer goes a bit more uptempo on this, her sixth album, and it’s a welcome move.

Facebook will remove adverts from restricted content after M&S and Sky become the latest to suspend their advertising

New system promises to stop adverts appearing next to controversial or offensive material

Agenda: John Newman; Julia Davis; wedding season; 10 O'Clock Live; New York-style dining

People, places, notes and observations...

Album: Gwyneth Herbert, The Sea Cabinet (Monkeywood)

Recorded by the sea in Aldeburgh, Herbert's sort-of concept album is changeable as the ocean.

Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
healthSteven Shaw - the 'Buddha of Breaststroke' - applies Alexander Technique to the watery sport
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footballShirt then goes on sale on Gumtree
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Terry Sue-Patt as Benny in the BBC children’s soap ‘Grange Hill’
voicesGrace Dent on Grange Hill and Terry Sue-Patt
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The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
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Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010
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A poster by Durham Constabulary
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Cameron Jerome
footballCanaries beat Boro to gain promotion to the Premier League
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artCancer survivor Emily McDowell kicks back at the clichés
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Twin Peaks stars Joan Chen, Michael Ontkean, Kyle Maclachlan and Piper Laurie
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine