Arts and Entertainment On the cutting edge: Johnny Vegas, from the Face of Satire exhibition at the BFI

On 26 February, Spitting Image will celebrate its 30 birthday. BBC Four will mark the occasion with a special episode of Arena which promises to tell the “vexed and frequently hilarious story” of the sketch show which ran for 21 series between 1984 and 1996 and marked a high point in British satire.

Adam Buxton

Edinburgh 2013: Adam Buxton's Kernel Panic is comedy for the YouTube generation

If you like to spend your free time laughing at mad, misspelt and hyperbolic comments on web forums, then Adam Buxton's brand of piss-take comedy for the YouTube generation will be right up your street.

The Answer to Everything: When a house is not a home

The Royal Opera House and Glyndebourne have relayed live operas to cinemas. But for the first time next week, an opera will premiere at a London cinema.

A scene from Vertigo, with James Stewart and Kim Novak, which has been voted the greatest of all

Vertigo hits the dizzy heights as critics name it best film of all time

Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 thriller Vertigo is the greatest film of all time, according to an once-in-a-decade poll of critics which has deposed Citizen Kane from the top spot.

The Lorax, a furry gnome voiced by Danny DeVito, is the orange purveyor of a green message

Dr Seuss' The Lorax, Chris Renad, 86 mins (U)

An ecological fable ... padded out with industrial levels of filler

Meet me in St Louis: Even if you've never seen
Harrison Ford in the PG-rated 'Indiana Jones and The Temple of Doom'

Not doomed after all: Indiana Jones finally wins censorship battle

Uncut versions of classic movies to be screened to mark 100 years of the Board of Film Classification

Mammuth, Benoît Delépine, Gustave Kervern, 92 mins (PG)

A meat-processing worker mounts his bike in search of his pension; but the real story is that, although Gérard Depardieu has become porky, his career is still in good shape

Nic Roeg and the lost visionaries of British cinema

As 'the country's greatest film-maker' is celebrated, Geoffrey Macnab asks why Nic Roeg and others can't get a movie made

The day the New Wave came crashing down

Profile: François Truffaut - They were the Lennon and McCartney of French cinema. And then Jean-Luc Godard spurned his oldest friend

Fashion in Film Festival: A magical, material world

This year's Fashion in Film Festival is a paean to the power of costume on camera, says Laura McLean-Ferris, and a reminder of a truly ingenious cinematic age

The art of the 'silent' pianist

My first inkling of the art demanded for the accompaniment of silent films came when I watched a young Carl Davis sit down at my piano and deliver a dazzling preview of his score for Abel Gance's five-hour epic, Napoleon. That was three decades ago, since when Davis's scores have become big business. Though his route has been orchestral, accompaniments on the piano are still provided for silent classics at the National Film Theatre. And the champion at that is the young classical pianist-composer Costas Fotopoulos, who has been providing the music for a clutch of rare Frank Capra movies at London's BFI Southbank, with the final one – Rain or Shine – due to be screened tomorrow.

Deborah Kerr: From Scotland to eternity

It's a long way from Helensburgh to Hawaii. When you watch Deborah Kerr and Burt Lancaster in their celebrated clinch on the beach in From Here To Eternity ("nobody ever kissed me like you do!"), you realise just what an extraordinary metamorphosis Kerr underwent in the course of her movie career. The Scottish-born star (the subject of a retrospective at the BFI in partnership with The Independent during September and October) seemed in her early film career to be the most upstanding and "proper" of actresses. She had a shy and aloof quality.

Harryhausen's birthday: time to celebrate a titan of Hollywood

Ray Harryhausen – the daddy of stop-motion animation – turns 90 next week. Tomorrow, BFI Southbank rounds off a month of screenings and events with a celebration hosted by the director John Landis. It is comforting to know that though computers dominate special-effects nowadays, his pioneering techniques are still admired.

Travel By Numbers: South Bank

As Tate Modern celebrates its 10th birthday, Ben Ross adds up the attractions of London's cultural hub
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Where the spooks get their coffee fix: The busiest Starbucks in the US is also the most secretive

The secret CIA Starbucks

The coffee shop is deep inside the agency's forested Virginia compound
Revealed: How the Establishment closed ranks over fallout from Loch Ness Monster 'sighting'

How the Establishment closed ranks over fallout from Nessie 'sighting'

The Natural History Museum's chief scientist was dismissed for declaring he had found the monster
One million Britons using food banks, according to Trussell Trust

One million Britons using food banks

Huge surge in number of families dependent on emergency food aid
Excavation at Italian cafe to fix rising damp unearths 2,500 years of history in 3,000 amazing objects

2,500 years of history in 3,000 amazing objects

Excavation at Italian cafe to fix rising damp unearths trove
The Hubble Space Telescope's amazing journey, 25 years on

The Hubble Space Telescope's amazing journey 25 years on

The space telescope was seen as a costly flop on its first release
Did Conservative peer Lord Ashcroft quit the House of Lords to become a non-dom?

Did Lord Ashcroft quit the House of Lords to become a non-dom?

A document seen by The Independent shows that a week after he resigned from the Lords he sold 350,000 shares in an American company - netting him $11.2m
Apple's ethnic emojis are being used to make racist comments on social media

Ethnic emojis used in racist comments

They were intended to promote harmony, but have achieved the opposite
Sir Kenneth Branagh interview: 'My bones are in the theatre'

Sir Kenneth Branagh: 'My bones are in the theatre'

The actor-turned-director’s new company will stage five plays from October – including works by Shakespeare and John Osborne
The sloth is now the face (and furry body) of three big advertising campaigns

The sloth is the face of three ad campaigns

Priya Elan discovers why slow and sleepy wins the race for brands in need of a new image
How to run a restaurant: As two newbies discovered, there's more to it than good food

How to run a restaurant

As two newbies discovered, there's more to it than good food
Record Store Day: Remembering an era when buying and selling discs were labours of love

Record Store Day: The vinyl countdown

For Lois Pryce, working in a record shop was a dream job - until the bean counters ruined it
Usher, Mary J Blige and Will.i.am to give free concert as part of the Global Poverty Project

Mary J Blige and Will.i.am to give free concert

The concert in Washington is part of the Global Citizen project, which aims to encourage young people to donate to charity
10 best tote bags

Accessorise with a stylish shopper this spring: 10 best tote bags

We find carriers with room for all your essentials (and a bit more)
Paul Scholes column: I hear Manchester City are closing on Pep Guardiola for next summer – but I'd also love to see Jürgen Klopp managing in England

Paul Scholes column

I hear Manchester City are closing on Pep Guardiola for next summer – but I'd also love to see Jürgen Klopp managing in England
Jessica Ennis-Hill: 'I just want to give it my best shot'

Jessica Ennis-Hill: 'I just want to give it my best shot'

The heptathlete has gone from the toast of the nation to being a sleep-deprived mum - but she’s ready to compete again. She just doesn't know how well she'll do...