Voices

Nick Williams's criticisms of the absence of creativity in Britain's education system are far from a case of "he would say that, wouldn't he". The out-going principal of the BRIT School for performing arts laments the fact that Britain leads the world in any number of creative industries, yet our schools teach less drama, less music and less art than ever before. How right he is.

Top school condemns 'prejudice' over arts

The retiring principal of the BRIT School for performing arts has accused the Department for Education of "living in a state of fear" and denying children the vocational teaching they need for future careers in the creative industries.

Video: School bus crashes in Chesterfield

Several children have been injured after a school bus crashed into a low railway bridge in Chesterfield.

DfE school performance tables 2010

Search the Department for Education site by institution, postcode, region or constituency

The 50 best back-to-school buys

From anti-smell sports bags to indestructible lunchboxes, Kate Watson-Smyth presents the coolest kit for surviving the year ahead

Ofsted targets bad behaviour

Behaviour in a fifth of schools is not good enough, official figures suggest. Some 21.3 per cent of schools were judged to be just "satisfactory" or "inadequate" in terms of pupil behaviour by Ofsted inspectors last year, according to statistics published by the Department for Children, Schools and Families.

The 50 best back to school buys

From designer notebooks to lovable lunchbags, Clare Dwyer Hogg packs a satchel with everything your children need for a new term

The Back 9 - 5 March 2009

My story: "To begin with it was just name calling"

Stephen Sellers, 16, suffered from bullying when he was younger. Read his story here…

Letter: Section 28 is wrong

Sir: Rupert Thorne says he is grateful for the ban on the "aggressive promotion" of homosexuality in schools. As this never took place in any school in the United Kingdom, I wonder why it had to be banned.

Education: Letter - Burning issues for beacon schools

I can understand the misgivings arising about the likelihood of beacon schools becoming elitist and selective, if they are not these already. However, it would be a mistake for heads and staff at other schools to shun the idea completely. Consider the advantages of two-way movement between beacon and non-beacon schools.

Letter: Inspecting Ofsted

Letter: Inspecting Ofsted

Special needs pupils get pounds 11m boost for access to schools

The Government yesterday announced a boost of pounds 11m to help mainstream schools become more accessible to special needs children. Estelle Morris, the schools minister, told MPs that the almost three-fold increase on the pounds 4m set aside by the previous administration for the Schools Access Initiative was the most that had ever been spent on the initiative in any year.

Letter: Care after school

Sir: I am a single parent from the "not so deserving" category outlined by Lynne Reid Banks (letter, 27 November). Thankfully I am in work, and supporting myself and my son.

LETTER : School uniforms have changed

Sir: Regarding David Blunkett's enthusiasm for school uniforms: at my old school, Maes Garmon in Yr Wyddgrug (Mold), we wore blazers emblazoned with the school motto Ni Lwyddir Heb Lafur - "There Is No Success Without Labour". Perhaps Mr Blunkett might like to adopt that as a countrywide motto.

Letter: Danger: learning

Sir: On the subject of homework for schoolchildren (leading article, 14 January; letters, 16 January), I was once teaching at a secondary modern school. The question of homework came up, and one boy said: "My dad don't agree with homework. He says you only set it so as we can learn more."
News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
people
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
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New Real Madrid signing James Rodríguez with club president Florentino Perez
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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
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What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

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The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
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The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
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Are you my type?

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Honesty box hotels

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Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

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Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
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A Bible for billionaires

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Paranoid parenting is on the rise

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Magna Carta Island goes on sale

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We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

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The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

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