Baseball National League

Wally Yonamine: Sportsman who fought prejudice in two sports and in

Wally Yonamine was a sportsman whose career forced him to face prejudice in two separate sports, on two separate continents, and for opposite reasons. In 1947, playing American football for the San Francisco 49ers, the first Japanese-American in the professional game, he faced considerable resentment resulting from the recently-ended war against Japan. And as the first foreigner to play baseball in the Japanese major leagues, he was referred to as the "Japanese Jackie Robinson", after the black star who integrated American baseball, and faced a similar onslaught of racial abuse and harsh treatment.

Bobby Thompson: Baseball player who hit ‘the shot heard round

For most students of history, the "shot heard around the world" is either the one at Concord, Massachusetts in 1775 that started the American War of Independence, or the one that killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand in 1914. But for baseball fans it means something else: the most famous home run of all, hit by Bobby Thomson to win the National League pennant for the New York Giants in 1951.

Baseball: Lee's wizardry gives Phillies the ideal start

The first World Series game played at the new Yankee Stadium was turned into a sombre affair by Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Cliff Lee. The left-hander gave the crowd of 50,207 little to cheer about while leading the 2008 World Series champions to a 6-1 victory over the New York Yankees in the first game of the 2009 Fall Classic on Wednesday.

Baseball: Hall of shame

As Manny Ramirez becomes the latest superstar slugger to be tainted by the suspicion of using steroids, Rupert Cornwell traces baseball's doping epidemic back to an addiction to home runs

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