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It will be difficult – but not impossible – to detect the chemical breakdown products of any nerve agents that may have been used in the Damascus attack, but access to the victims could be critical in proving the illicit use of chemical weapons.

Jessica Judd has put her exam results on the back-burner

World Championships 2013: Jessica Judd faces track test as tough as her A-levels

The world's best will examine recent strides made by Britain's middle-distance rookie

US scientists have made claims that low-doses of aspirin may stop growth of breast cancer

Low-dose aspirin may stop growth of breast cancer, study suggests

Small doses of aspirin may block the growth and spread of the most virulent strains of breast cancer, research has revealed.

Scientists are closer to building a biological computer after they managed to make a transistor from DNA and RNA

Biological computer that 'lives' inside the body comes one step closer as scientists make transistor out of DNA and RNA

Finding could lead to new biodegradable devices based on living cells that are capable of detecting changes in the environment

Standing up daily for an extra 90 minutes significantly lowers your chances of developing this serious metabolic disorder

Desk workers - stand up for your health: Millions may be making themselves ill by spending their working lives sitting down

If you are reading this sitting down then the chances are you are also increasing your risk of developing heart disease, blood clots on the brain and even certain types of cancer.

Levi-Montalcini: she attributed her success partly to ‘the habit of underestimating obstacles’

Rita Levi-Montalcini: Neuroscientist honoured for her work on cell development

Her experience of women’s subordinate role, she said, told her 'I was not cut out to be a wife'

Two American scientists win Nobel chemistry prize for understanding how the billions of cells within the human body communicate with the outside world

Robert Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka won the prize for their pioneering roles in revealing the inner workings of an important family of protein molecules called the G-protein-coupled receptors

Rashid Ramzi has been named as one of six competitors from last summer's Beijing Games who have failed retrospective tests for
the blood-boosting hormone CERA

Delay awarding Olympic medals for eight years, says biochemist

Medals won at the London Olympics should not handed out until 2020 because it will be years before testers can be sure that the athletes did not take drugs, a leading sports scientist has suggested.

Chris Cooper: The biochemist says cheat may exploit medical breakthroughs

Delay awarding London 2012 Olympic medals for eight years, says biochemist

Cheating athletes 'could exploit medical advances by using drugs not yet detectable'

Performance boost: Canadian sprinter Ben Johnson

Run, Swim Throw, Cheat: The Science Behind Drugs In Sport, By Chris Cooper

A scientific review of genetic technology that can give tomorrow's athletes a helping hand

Breakthrough could lead to cure for chronic liver disease

Medical scientists have taken an important step towards understanding how the diseased liver can repair itself in a breakthrough that could eventually lead to the development of new treatments for chronic liver illnesses, which at present can only be cured by organ transplants.

Mild chemical agents are used for cases similar to the Tottenham riots

Government 'may sanction chemical incapacitant use on rioters', scientists fear

Leading neuroscientists believe that the UK Government may be about to sanction the development of chemical incapacitants for British police that would be banned in warfare under an international treaty on chemical weapons.

Digital 3D 'bins' have a place, but will twitchers be switchers?

A greenfinch looks on suspiciously from afar. The finest details of his green and yellow plumage and his eyes twitching from side to side are visible through the binoculars.

Empires of Food, By Evan DG Fraser and Andrew Rimas

Written in lively style by two American academics, this book questions the stability of the "food empire" on which humanity depends. We are complacent, they claim, due to four assumptions: there will be more "biochemical fixes" to maintain bumper crops; continuation of the "mild, sunny weather" of recent centuries; dependence on fragile monocultures; reliance on cheap fossil fuels to power freezers and synthesise fertilisers. "For a hundred years," the authors point out, "our industrial food empire has been astoundingly successful but all empires stumble and fall."

Baruch Blumberg

Further to yesterday's obituary of the Nobel Prize-winning scientist Baruch Blumberg, Tam Dalyell writes:

Last Night's TV: Women in Love/BBC4<br />Monroe/ITV1<br />A Farmer's Life For Me/BBC2

Rather a lot happened in the first part of BBC4's Women in Love – two drownings, at least one fight, a rape – though you wouldn't necessarily know it. The quiet, almost whimsical, nature of William Ivory's script allowed events to unfold gently, playing second fiddle to the internal dramas of the characters. It's a risky strategy: an adaptation of D H Lawrence's dual novels, The Rainbow and Women in Love, in which the predominant themes are sex and guilt could be a recipe for introspective torpor if ever there was one. And yet, to my mind, it all came off.

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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project