Bob Marley

Bob Marley: Rastaman vibration

Thirty years after his death, Bob Marley's legend lives on. But no other artist has matched his enduring influence on music and culture. Why? By Ian Burrell

Nas & Damian Marley/ Erykah Badu, Wembley Arena, London

There's always been a natural synergy between hip-hop and reggae: the rebellious sentiment, the headstrong figureheads, all respectively communicating a struggle that seems to transcend their own tribes of followers and find its place on a bigger stage. So it wasn't a complete shock that when Nas and Damian Marley released their collaborative album, Distant Relatives, last year, it resonated with music lovers and critics alike – even though it unashamedly preached about social injustice, poverty and Africa. On stage, it's explosive.

Women of the World, Royal Festival Hall, London

"Women of the world, take over," the whimsical Scots bard Ivor Cutler once urged, his advice taken last Friday at a concert featuring women performers from different strata of the musical spectrum.

Judge condemns rehab clinic used by the stars

A private rehabilitation clinic used by celebrities including the singer Amy Winehouse and the actor Jonathan Rhys-Meyers was condemned by a judge yesterday for standards that would "shame a Third World country".

Album: Burning Spear, Marcus Garvey/Garvey's Ghost (Island)

Burning Spear's Marcus Garvey was one of the founding texts of 1970s roots reggae, an album which confirmed to the growing crossover British market that Bob Marley may just be the tip of a huge wave of talent about to break out of Jamaica.

For sale: Bob Marley

Bootleggers have made a fortune out of the reggae star's image since his death. Now his family are planning to cash in with their own merchandising deal. David Usborne reports

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