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The Timeline: Glastonbury Festival

Farmer Michael Eavis decides to hold a festival to pay off his overdraft. With tickets costing £1 and free milk provided, 1,500 people descend on Worthy Farm near Pilton in Somerset to watch sets from the likes of T Rex (standing in for The Kinks). Eavis is so enamoured with it he decides to continue.

Aung San Suu Kyi: A triumph of the spirit

A film of Aung San Suu Kyi, commissioned by U2 and smuggled out of Burma, has gone with them on a world tour which reaches Glastonbury on Friday. Martin Wroe had a clandestine meeting with her in Rangoon

Healing Hans, the celebrities' favourite doctor

Usain Bolt is not the only client of Dr Hans-Wilhelm Müller-Wohlfahrt who happens to be getting back on track after seeking treatment for a spinal problem from the Munich medicine man referred to in sporting circles as "Healing Hans". In May last year, Paul Hewson suffered a temporary paralysis which meant he and his band were obliged to withdraw as the headline act at the Glastonbury Festival.

Holy arena tour: Will Batman be ready for his live stage debut?

"Tonight," says Batman, reading from his cue card, "there will be three homicides in Gotham City. There will be 39 burglaries and 27 robberies. There's an old saying: 'Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.' It's simpler with me: I'm not complicated by friends."

Dark nights on Broadway

New York theatre is in crisis – with word of mouth so bad that shows are closing even before opening night.

Diary: Bono and the art of creation

"Creating art that has never been done before is the reason I get out of bed in the morning," diminutive U2 frontman Paul "Bono" Hewson has informed The New York Times, before comparing his latest work with that of Rilke, William Blake, Wim Wenders and Roy Lichtenstein. The project in question? Spider-Man, the musical, which begins previews on Broadway next week after a postponement for extra rehearsals. The man Tony Blair thought would make a better Prime Minister than Gordon Brown – a singer, activist, hotelier, sometime newspaper editor and leading investor in "arguably the worst run institutional fund of any size in the United States" – went on, "If the only wows you get from Spider-Man are visual, special-effect, spectacular-type wows, and not wows from the soul and the heart, we will all think that we've failed." Perhaps anticipating more critical "hmms" than "wows", Paul plans to be in Australia when the curtain rises on the first performance.

More headlines

Diary: Writing on wall for Bono

Bono – singer, activist, hotelier, sometime newspaper editor and investor in "arguably the worst run institutional fund of any size in the United States" – is mired in controversies over his anti-poverty foundation, ONE, and ethical fashion house, Edun.

Diary: Paul Hewson for PM

While Blair was long convinced that Brown would be a poor prime minister, he seems to have no such compunction about recommending Bono for a similar role. The U2 frontman, Blair writes (on page 555), "could have been a president or prime minister standing on his head. He had an absolutely natural gift for politicking, was great with people, very smart and an inspirational speaker... motivated by an abundant desire to keep on improving, never really content or relaxed. I knew he would work with George [W Bush] well, and with none of the prissy disdain of most of his ilk". Bono's nationality (not to say his tax arrangements) would preclude him from leading a British political party. One assumes he would also have to revert to his real name, Paul Hewson, to be taken seriously in high office. But familiarity with the world of finance would surely qualify him for leadership in Ireland: his investment fund, Elevation Partners, has been described as "arguably the worst run institutional fund of any size in the United States".