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Stricken Wildcats lose Obst to Hull

Wakefield's new owners have lost a key player even before completing their takeover of the stricken club. The Wildcats' half-back or hooker, Sam Obst, has joined Hull on a two-year deal. He provides cover in two positions where they are short of options and Hull have paid an undisclosed fee.

Mother and two children found dead after father kills himself

A man is believed to have murdered his family before killing himself, after four bodies were discovered in Leicester over the weekend.

The lone sailor: I'm going to put on a Santa hat and take pictures of myself getting soaked on the deck

Loneliness and sadness cast aside for one day only as brave Briton continues solo race round the world

End of an aura: Capello prepares to break up the Ferdinand-Terry axis

United defender in line to be casualty of long-term injury problem and emergence of Everton's Phil Jagielka as an England contender

How to create the perfect hallway

It's one of the most important rooms in the home, but it's too often overlooked. Kate Watson-Smyth presents the essential guide to making an entrance

Banking inquiry will consider break-up issue

The Government inquiry into banking reforms will consider breaking up Britain's largest high street banks to increase competition, it was confirmed today.

Story of the Song: Hanging on the Telephone, Blondie (1978)

Stuck on punk's West Coast outpost, The Nerves' fame barely made it out of California. The trio recorded a solitary, self-titled EP in 1976 before breaking up.

Six and a Half Loves, Pleasance Courtyard, Edinburgh

This is lovely. Terry Saunders's bittersweet animated shorts "about perfect couples who can never quite fulfil their perfection" have become something of a cult hit on YouTube and are now brought to life by the comedian on stage.

Story of the song: 'Don't Speak', No Doubt, 1996

When Gwen Stefani walked into the Anaheim house she shared with her brother and bandmates, she heard Eric Stefani playing a tender piano figure that stopped her in her tracks. The pair immediately set about writing the song that would become "Don't Speak". Gwen gushed out some lyrics: "I can see it all in an eye blink/ I know everything about how you are/ I can understand exactly how you think/ Between you and me, it's not very far." The verses celebrated Gwen's long-standing relationship with her bassist, Tony Kanal. It was a pretty, if lyrically unexceptional, love song; unusual for a band more noted for an energetic ska-pop. Melodically, though, it sounded like a hit. "The vibes were there, the chorus was almost exactly perfect," said the band's guitarist, Tom Dumont.

Ben Chu: The case for breaking up Barclays

Regular readers of this blog will be unsurprised to hear that I disagree with the argument of my colleague, James Moore, that breaking up Barclays Bank would be a bad idea.

James Moore: Why breaking up barclays bank doesnt look so clever

So now we know. Barclays is Britain’s strongest bank, and by quite some way. Even under a stressed scenario considered by Europe’s banking watchdogs it would have a tier one capital ratio of 13.7 per cent.

Village People: Breaking up early

Good news for MPs: they are getting two days' extra holiday. The Commons was to break up for the summer on Thursday week, 29 July, but a last-minute decision has brought the date forward to 27 July. Why? You might well ask.

Ben Chu: Size does matter in banking

Stephen Green is also, apparently, a defender of the unholy status quo when it comes to the structure of the banking industry, telling the British Bankers’ Association conference yesterday that calls for the break up of the banks are a red herring:

Album: Sarah McLachlan, Laws of Illusion (Arista)

Though her 1997 song "Angel" has become a fixture at funerals, seven years on, Sarah McLachlan is feeling a little more light-hearted, and while the Canadian's folksy, Pilates-honed latest is influenced by her broken marriage, don't expect bitterness here.

Voters ponder Belgian break-up as polls open

Belgians are going to the polls today in general elections that are widely seen as a vote on an orderly break-up of a country where 6.5 million Dutch and four million French-speakers are locked in a quarrelsome union.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent