News Head of St Mary’s, Mike Kennedy, aims for ‘all-comers’

The elite Catholic college, launchpad to many illustrious alumni, will be open to all-comers

Brendan Barber: ‘Unions have been working closely with industry to minimise losses’

Unions not just about strikes but helping the economy, says TUC chief

Trade unions need to reinvent themselves in the eyes of the public as organisations that are not about strikes and industrial disputes but about helping the economy to grow, the outgoing head of the Trades Union Congress has warned.

Welfare cuts will hit millions, warn union leaders

'Some households could lose up to £2,000 a year'

Embarrassment for Government as only 3.5% of participants in its work programme find long-term jobs

The Government today defended its flagship employment scheme against fierce criticism after new figures showed only 3.5% of those taking part had found sustainable jobs.

Picture posed by model

Stress ‘puts people out of work and on to benefits’

There are more than 250,000 claimants aged 35 to 44, and 83,000 between 18 and 24

On the streets: People of all ages made their feelings known at the march in London, above

Austerity brings out the protesters

Tens of thousands marched against government cuts in London, Glasgow and Belfast yesterday

Cautious welcome for workplace pensions scheme

Trades unions and employees gave a cautious welcome to the new workplace pensions scheme which began yesterday. People working for firms with more than 120,000 employees are now automatically enrolled in schemes to help them save for retirement.

Auto-enrolment pension scheme opens

A landmark scheme to automatically place millions of people into workplace pensions is now under way, with many workers saving for their future for less than the cost of a weekly pint of beer.

David Gauke under fire over tradesmen cash-in-hand comments

A Treasury minister who said it was “morally wrong” for householders to pay tradesmen in cash for a discount came under fire today from a body representing plumbers, builders and electricians.

Cowboy tax advisers to be named

Cowboy tax advisers who use avoidance schemes that push the law to its limits will be named and shamed, the Government said today.

Government proposes up to £1,200 tribunal fees

The Government sparked controversy today by announcing a fee of up to £1,200 for taking claims to an employment tribunal.

Rising pension values of affluent worsens inequalities

The UK's wealth gap is widening as a growing pensions apartheid leaves the poorest with retirement pots worth just a fraction of the rich, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said yesterday.

Nick Clegg in employee ownership push

The Government announced moves today to promote employee ownership and make it easier for people to run their own business.

Inflation higher for poor families

The cost of living has been rising more quickly for the poorest households as a result of higher energy and food bills, according to new research.

GDP data 'shows cuts are not working'

There were fresh calls for the Government to scale back its austerity measures today after figures confirmed the UK had returned to recession.

Unions question pay gap figures

Unions questioned official figures today showing an 8% gap in the average hourly pay of public and private sector workers, warning that the figures could now be "widely misused."

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

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'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

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This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

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Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

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Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine