News Brian Sewell, art critic

The revelation by Brian Sewell, the London Evening Standard's eminent art critic, that he had an affair in 1963 with the strenuously heterosexual Tatler editor Mark Boxer sent shockwaves around the art and journalistic worlds.

Martin Sewell, an economics supervisor at Cambridge. Far right, the 'Political Correctness' section of his website

Students protest at 'racist' supervisor

Cambridge don calls black people 'impulsive'

Rebecca Tyrrel: Damien Hirst says of snooker champ Ronnie O'Sullivan, 'He's like Picasso'

Who knew that Damien Hirst is close friends with the snooker star Ronnie O'Sullivan, and attends many of his matches? Hirst, who was watching O'Sullivan win the world championship at The Crucible in Sheffield the other week, compares his friend to legendary figures from his own world. "To me, he's like Picasso," he says. "Or perhaps more like Francis Bacon, because what he does is instinctive. Anything done to the level Ronnie has taken it is art."

Has Lynn Barber killed the art of criticism?

Telegraph's £65,000 payout for 'spiteful' article threatens to muzzle reviewers

Tom Lubbock, artist, critic and 'Independent' great, dies at 53

Tom Lubbock, the chief art critic of The Independent for the last 13 years and a respected illustrator in his own right, has died after a battle with cancer which he chronicled with characteristic candour. He was 53.

Radio 2010: The 101st amazing object – a wireless

The This Is Why I Pay My Licence Fee Award A History of the World in 100 Objects, a masterly sweep through the many ages of man led by the British Museum's Neil MacGregor, was the kind of thing the BBC does so well – big projects, superbly conceived and perfectly executed.

The new slaves: Children forced to work as farm labourers

Our campaign aims to persuade the Government to tackle human trafficking

The Week In Radio: Won over by the fast and furious life of Brian

There's a famous Monty Python sketch called Philosophers' Football, in which Greece, represented by Socrates, Archimedes and Plato take on Germany, with Hegel, Kant, Marx and Nietzsche. High culture meets low. It's brilliant. Anyway, I was reminded irresistibly of this when listening to the distinguished art critic Brian Sewell on his passion for stock-car racing. The BBC has a habit, let's call it Stephen Fry syndrome, whereby once they've found a presenter who can do something, they want them to do everything, witness Mark Lawson and Andrew Marr. Good at politics? Here's a history series. A doctor? Why not take on some wildlife, and archaeology while you're at it. Famous for fashion? What about a book programme. It's as though we're suffering some worldwide presenter shortage and all those bright young things emerging from media courses and YouTube simply needn't bother. It's a conundrum. Programme-makers complain that without a big name, their pitch won't get commissioned. Journalists need to prove their versatility. Older presenters cry ageism if they are sidelined. Yet there are times when stretching the talent is justified and Stock Car Sewell was one of them.

Stock Car Sewell, Radio 4<br/>Humph Celebration Concert, Radio 4

The prince of posh goes stock-car racing &ndash; and loves the colours

Can a garden be a work of art?

This week&rsquo;s Hampton Court Flower Show will see high-concept installations side by side with more genteel designs. Is gardening losing touch with its roots? Victoria Summerley grasps the nettle

My Polling Day: Well-known names reveal how they voted yesterday &ndash; and why

Max Clifford

Publicist

2005: Labour

2010: Labour

Constituency: Runneymede and Weybridge

Unveiling the new Warhol

Tim Burton, the man behind <i>Edward Scissorhands</i> and <i>Beetlejuice</i>, is hailed as the heir to the Pop throne with a new exhibition

Russian owners decide to give away Standard

Audacious gamble sees London's evening paper converted into freesheet

Drawing up battle lines &ndash; art gallery takes on Wikipedia

The appearance of some of the world's most famous portraits on a website could create a legal landmark
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A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
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Lane Del Rey performing on the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury 2014
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Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmA cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
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Louis van Gaal watches over Nani
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Flora Spencer-Longhurst as Lavinia, William Houston as Titus Andronicus and Dyfan Dwyfor as Lucius
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
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Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn