News Brian Sewell, art critic

The revelation by Brian Sewell, the London Evening Standard's eminent art critic, that he had an affair in 1963 with the strenuously heterosexual Tatler editor Mark Boxer sent shockwaves around the art and journalistic worlds.

Martin Sewell, an economics supervisor at Cambridge. Far right, the 'Political Correctness' section of his website

Students protest at 'racist' supervisor

Cambridge don calls black people 'impulsive'

Rebecca Tyrrel: Damien Hirst says of snooker champ Ronnie O'Sullivan, 'He's like Picasso'

Who knew that Damien Hirst is close friends with the snooker star Ronnie O'Sullivan, and attends many of his matches? Hirst, who was watching O'Sullivan win the world championship at The Crucible in Sheffield the other week, compares his friend to legendary figures from his own world. "To me, he's like Picasso," he says. "Or perhaps more like Francis Bacon, because what he does is instinctive. Anything done to the level Ronnie has taken it is art."

Has Lynn Barber killed the art of criticism?

Telegraph's £65,000 payout for 'spiteful' article threatens to muzzle reviewers

Tom Lubbock, artist, critic and 'Independent' great, dies at 53

Tom Lubbock, the chief art critic of The Independent for the last 13 years and a respected illustrator in his own right, has died after a battle with cancer which he chronicled with characteristic candour. He was 53.

Radio 2010: The 101st amazing object – a wireless

The This Is Why I Pay My Licence Fee Award A History of the World in 100 Objects, a masterly sweep through the many ages of man led by the British Museum's Neil MacGregor, was the kind of thing the BBC does so well – big projects, superbly conceived and perfectly executed.

The new slaves: Children forced to work as farm labourers

Our campaign aims to persuade the Government to tackle human trafficking

The Week In Radio: Won over by the fast and furious life of Brian

There's a famous Monty Python sketch called Philosophers' Football, in which Greece, represented by Socrates, Archimedes and Plato take on Germany, with Hegel, Kant, Marx and Nietzsche. High culture meets low. It's brilliant. Anyway, I was reminded irresistibly of this when listening to the distinguished art critic Brian Sewell on his passion for stock-car racing. The BBC has a habit, let's call it Stephen Fry syndrome, whereby once they've found a presenter who can do something, they want them to do everything, witness Mark Lawson and Andrew Marr. Good at politics? Here's a history series. A doctor? Why not take on some wildlife, and archaeology while you're at it. Famous for fashion? What about a book programme. It's as though we're suffering some worldwide presenter shortage and all those bright young things emerging from media courses and YouTube simply needn't bother. It's a conundrum. Programme-makers complain that without a big name, their pitch won't get commissioned. Journalists need to prove their versatility. Older presenters cry ageism if they are sidelined. Yet there are times when stretching the talent is justified and Stock Car Sewell was one of them.

Stock Car Sewell, Radio 4<br/>Humph Celebration Concert, Radio 4

The prince of posh goes stock-car racing &ndash; and loves the colours

Can a garden be a work of art?

This week&rsquo;s Hampton Court Flower Show will see high-concept installations side by side with more genteel designs. Is gardening losing touch with its roots? Victoria Summerley grasps the nettle

My Polling Day: Well-known names reveal how they voted yesterday &ndash; and why

Max Clifford

Publicist

2005: Labour

2010: Labour

Constituency: Runneymede and Weybridge

Unveiling the new Warhol

Tim Burton, the man behind <i>Edward Scissorhands</i> and <i>Beetlejuice</i>, is hailed as the heir to the Pop throne with a new exhibition

Russian owners decide to give away Standard

Audacious gamble sees London's evening paper converted into freesheet

Drawing up battle lines &ndash; art gallery takes on Wikipedia

The appearance of some of the world's most famous portraits on a website could create a legal landmark
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Turkey-Kurdish conflict: Obama's deal with Ankara is a betrayal of Syrian Kurds and may not even weaken Isis

US betrayal of old ally brings limited reward

Since the accord, the Turks have only waged war on Kurds while no US bomber has used Incirlik airbase, says Patrick Cockburn
VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but doubts linger over security

'A gift from Egypt to the rest of the world'

VIPs gather for opening of second Suez Canal - but is it really needed?
Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Jeremy Corbyn dresses abysmally. That's a great thing because it's genuine

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, applauds a man who clearly has more important things on his mind
The male menopause and intimations of mortality

Aches, pains and an inkling of mortality

So the male menopause is real, they say, but what would the Victorians, 'old' at 30, think of that, asks DJ Taylor
Man Booker Prize 2015: Anna Smaill - How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?

'How can I possibly be on the list with these writers I have idolised?'

Man Booker Prize nominee Anna Smaill on the rise of Kiwi lit
Bettany Hughes interview: The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems

Bettany Hughes interview

The historian on how Socrates would have solved Greece's problems
Art of the state: Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China

Art of the state

Pyongyang propaganda posters to be exhibited in China
Mildreds and Vanilla Black have given vegetarian food a makeover in new cookbooks

Vegetarian food gets a makeover

Long-time vegetarian Holly Williams tries to recreate some of the inventive recipes in Mildreds and Vanilla Black's new cookbooks
The haunting of Shirley Jackson: Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?

The haunting of Shirley Jackson

Was the gothic author's life really as bleak as her fiction?
Bill Granger recipes: Heading off on holiday? Try out our chef's seaside-inspired dishes...

Bill Granger's seaside-inspired recipes

These dishes are so easy to make, our chef is almost embarrassed to call them recipes
Ashes 2015: Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

Tourists are limp, leaderless and distinctly UnAustralian

A woefully out-of-form Michael Clarke embodies his team's fragile Ashes campaign, says Michael Calvin
Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza

Andrew Grice: Inside Westminster

Blairites be warned, this could be the moment Labour turns into Syriza
HMS Victory: The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

The mystery of Britain's worst naval disaster is finally solved - 271 years later

Exclusive: David Keys reveals the research that finally explains why HMS Victory went down with the loss of 1,100 lives
Survivors of the Nagasaki atomic bomb attack: Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism

'I saw people so injured you couldn't tell if they were dead or alive'

Nagasaki survivors on why Japan must not abandon its post-war pacifism
Jon Stewart: The voice of Democrats who felt Obama had failed to deliver on his 'Yes We Can' slogan, and the voter he tried hardest to keep onside

The voter Obama tried hardest to keep onside

Outgoing The Daily Show host, Jon Stewart, became the voice of Democrats who felt the President had failed to deliver on his ‘Yes We Can’ slogan. Tim Walker charts the ups and downs of their 10-year relationship on screen