News Brian Sewell, art critic

The revelation by Brian Sewell, the London Evening Standard's eminent art critic, that he had an affair in 1963 with the strenuously heterosexual Tatler editor Mark Boxer sent shockwaves around the art and journalistic worlds.

Martin Sewell, an economics supervisor at Cambridge. Far right, the 'Political Correctness' section of his website

Students protest at 'racist' supervisor

Cambridge don calls black people 'impulsive'

Rebecca Tyrrel: Damien Hirst says of snooker champ Ronnie O'Sullivan, 'He's like Picasso'

Who knew that Damien Hirst is close friends with the snooker star Ronnie O'Sullivan, and attends many of his matches? Hirst, who was watching O'Sullivan win the world championship at The Crucible in Sheffield the other week, compares his friend to legendary figures from his own world. "To me, he's like Picasso," he says. "Or perhaps more like Francis Bacon, because what he does is instinctive. Anything done to the level Ronnie has taken it is art."

Has Lynn Barber killed the art of criticism?

Telegraph's £65,000 payout for 'spiteful' article threatens to muzzle reviewers

Tom Lubbock, artist, critic and 'Independent' great, dies at 53

Tom Lubbock, the chief art critic of The Independent for the last 13 years and a respected illustrator in his own right, has died after a battle with cancer which he chronicled with characteristic candour. He was 53.

Radio 2010: The 101st amazing object – a wireless

The This Is Why I Pay My Licence Fee Award A History of the World in 100 Objects, a masterly sweep through the many ages of man led by the British Museum's Neil MacGregor, was the kind of thing the BBC does so well – big projects, superbly conceived and perfectly executed.

The new slaves: Children forced to work as farm labourers

Our campaign aims to persuade the Government to tackle human trafficking

The Week In Radio: Won over by the fast and furious life of Brian

There's a famous Monty Python sketch called Philosophers' Football, in which Greece, represented by Socrates, Archimedes and Plato take on Germany, with Hegel, Kant, Marx and Nietzsche. High culture meets low. It's brilliant. Anyway, I was reminded irresistibly of this when listening to the distinguished art critic Brian Sewell on his passion for stock-car racing. The BBC has a habit, let's call it Stephen Fry syndrome, whereby once they've found a presenter who can do something, they want them to do everything, witness Mark Lawson and Andrew Marr. Good at politics? Here's a history series. A doctor? Why not take on some wildlife, and archaeology while you're at it. Famous for fashion? What about a book programme. It's as though we're suffering some worldwide presenter shortage and all those bright young things emerging from media courses and YouTube simply needn't bother. It's a conundrum. Programme-makers complain that without a big name, their pitch won't get commissioned. Journalists need to prove their versatility. Older presenters cry ageism if they are sidelined. Yet there are times when stretching the talent is justified and Stock Car Sewell was one of them.

Stock Car Sewell, Radio 4<br/>Humph Celebration Concert, Radio 4

The prince of posh goes stock-car racing &ndash; and loves the colours

Can a garden be a work of art?

This week&rsquo;s Hampton Court Flower Show will see high-concept installations side by side with more genteel designs. Is gardening losing touch with its roots? Victoria Summerley grasps the nettle

My Polling Day: Well-known names reveal how they voted yesterday &ndash; and why

Max Clifford

Publicist

2005: Labour

2010: Labour

Constituency: Runneymede and Weybridge

Unveiling the new Warhol

Tim Burton, the man behind <i>Edward Scissorhands</i> and <i>Beetlejuice</i>, is hailed as the heir to the Pop throne with a new exhibition

Russian owners decide to give away Standard

Audacious gamble sees London's evening paper converted into freesheet

Drawing up battle lines &ndash; art gallery takes on Wikipedia

The appearance of some of the world's most famous portraits on a website could create a legal landmark
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Isis in Iraq: Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment by militants

'Jilan killed herself in the bathroom. She cut her wrists and hanged herself'

Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment
Ed Balls interview: 'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'

Ed Balls interview

'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'
He's behind you, dude!

US stars in UK panto

From David Hasselhoff to Jerry Hall
Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz: What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?

Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz

What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?
Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Planet’s surface is inhospitable to humans but 30 miles above it is almost perfect
Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all
The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

Sony suffered a chorus of disapproval after it withdrew 'The Interview', but it's not too late for it to take a stand, says Joan Smith
From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?

Panto dames: before and after

From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?
Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Booksellers say readers are turning away from dark modern thrillers and back to the golden age of crime writing
Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best,' says founder of JustGiving

Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best'

Ten million of us have used the JustGiving website to donate to good causes. Its co-founder says that being dynamic is as important as being kind
The botanist who hunts for giant trees at Kew Gardens

The man who hunts giants

A Kew Gardens botanist has found 25 new large tree species - and he's sure there are more out there