News

Robber needed money for polio-stricken cousin's surgery

Six confirmed dead in Austrian flats explosion

IT WAS the longest night of Bernhard Schachner's life as Austrian rescue services dug through the rubble of the apartment block that had been his home.

Country & Garden: There's a canal in here somewhere

Country Matters

Letter: Masonic honour

Sir: I resent the suggestion that I have used my Masonic office or my professional occupation to interfere with the duties of the trustees of a charitable trust or to place them under any duress ("Freemasons in an unbrotherly feud over Bronte's old lodge", 26 July).

Freemasons in an unbrotherly feud over Bronte's old lodge

AN ACRIMONIOUS dispute between freemasons over the future of an historic masonic hall has laid bare the brethren's secretive hierarchy.

The Sitter's Tale: Baroness Blackstone

New faces at the National Portrait Gallery: the academic and politician particularly enjoyed looking at the bricks

Prepare to mourn for Wembley's twin towers

IT'S NOT looking good for the twin towers. As Sir Norman Foster and Partners put the finishing touches to their design for a new National Stadium on the Wembley site, the signs are that English football's most famous symbols will suffer terminal relegation when the plans are announced in July.

First Night - Artful twists redeem the cliche of memory lane

`Sacred Heart' Royal Court London

So you want to be a Freemason

We know about the secret handshakes and aprons. But what do Masons actually do?

Masons appeal for new recruits

THE VEIL of secrecy that has shrouded Freemasonry for centuries has been lowered further after the ancient craft placed its first newspaper advertisement for new members.

Skiing: Maier denies Raich's slalom hat-trick

HERMANN MAIER kept his word and held his nerve in Adelboden, Switzerland, yesterday to win a World Cup giant slalom ahead of his team-mate Benjamin Raich.

Skiing: Austrians sweep to world record

HERMANN MAIER followed in the tracks of his hero, Franz Klammer, leading a record Austrian sweep of the top nine places in a World Cup super-G in front of 20,000 fans yesterday.

Home Life: Tip of the week - Frost damage to brickwork

WINTER frosts have arrived and frost damage to brickwork can be a problem. Brickwork naturally absorbs a certain amount of rainwater. When the weather is dry, the moisture evaporates and no harm is done but too much water soaked into the brickwork can promote frost damage. Frost can affect both bricks and mortar joints. When the absorbed water freezes it expands and can make mortar crumble and split away the surface of bricks. Over time the surface of the wall will flake and crumble away.

Property: The day our publican painted over the Georgian brickwork

A building may be historic but if it's not listed it can be altered for the worse.
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003