Arts and Entertainment Kylie Minogue's arrival as a judge for The Voice saw the BBC show thrash ITV's Splash

BBC show thrashes ITV's Splash, where viewing figures dived

Last Night's TV: Waterloo Road/BBC1<br />Midsomer Murders/ITV1<br />The Secret Life of Waves/BBC4

Don't you just love the National Television Awards – the way they puncture the rarefied illusion that the whole world is loving Mad Men or Skins or Peep Show, and where Ant and Dec and David Jason win a prize every year, even if they spent the previous 12 months sunning themselves in the Bahamas (hats off to Sir David for managing to remain in the O2 throughout Stephen Fry's embarrassingly luvvied-up introduction)? It's the sort of popularity contest in which Waterloo Road wins the Best Drama category against Sherlock and Shameless – the biggest shock of the night, although try telling that to Helen Worth, Gail from Coronation Street, who looked like she'd just had a tram come though her living room wall after EastEnders nicked the Best Soap award.

David Hasselhoff hands out religious advice

David Hasselhoff has been giving religious advice to contestants on 'Britain's Got Talent'.

Natalie Haynes: America can take a joke &ndash; from its own

Are the British finally taking Hollywood by storm? This week saw a several-pronged attack: Piers Morgan's new chat show debuted on CNN, with him interviewing the queen of chat herself, Oprah Winfrey. Ricky Gervais caused controversy with his second and, by all accounts, last hosting of the Golden Globes. And Colin Firth left the same awards ceremony with a Best Actor statuette in the bag and very short odds on him doing the same at the Oscars next month.

Ballet teacher sentenced for abducting boy

A ballet teacher who flouted a police order not to continue her inappropriate relationship with a talented and vulnerable 15-year-old boy dancer was handed a suspended jail term today.

Flawless, Royal Festival Hall, London

Bling on the dancers, but add an old hand

Wayne Rooney reveals management ambitions

Manchester United and England star Wayne Rooney has already started planning for life as a manager.

Reality television 2: They're the new generation games

'Strictly' is over and, as one season of contests closes, along come some unexpected innovations

David Randall: I'm not skiving &ndash; I'm working, but with a fag

The many benefits of the cigarette break

Business Diary: Is Gowers heading for a hat-trick?

The Diary has nothing against the man personally – he's terribly charming in fact – but here's a little warning to Footsie bosses concerning Andrew Gowers. The former Financial Times editor is in need of a new job, so it's very likely his CV will be passing across your desk shortly. Just bear in mind that after leaving the FT he went to Lehman Brothers as head of European communications, only for it to go bust. And that he then moved on to BP, only to see it suffer the catastrophic Gulf of Mexico spill. Now he's quit there too. Where will he pop up next? They say accidents run in threes.

Christina Patterson: Britain's got talent, but a lot of it's wasted

Susan Boyle said she was relieved not to be 'sitting at home being unemployed' with a talent she couldn't use

Album: Susan Boyle, The Gift (Syco)

On Susan Boyle's second album, the balance between hymns and popular songs that characterised I Dreamed a Dream tilts more decisively churchwards, with a preponderance of carols now peppered with just a smattering of secular material, and an overly religiose tone applied to the likes of "Perfect Day" and "Hallelujah", songs at least partly written about heroin and orgasm, respectively.

Sport on TV: Working man's ballet? Let's hope Diamonds are forever

Watching England play football is becoming so excruciatingly dull that it's about time there was some other entertainment on the bill. The obvious answer is cheerleaders, but pretty girls gyrating in revealing costumes might prove a little too distracting for our players.

Terence Blacker: Meet Mr and Mrs Average

The world may be awash with a daily torrent of surveys, graphs, league tables and flow-charts, but there are still those who believe we need more numbers to make sense of modern life. For them, the two little words "per cent" represent all that is real and true. To encourage even more mathematical analysis of all we do and think, the UN will next week launch World Statistics Day.

Turner Prize winner makes debut feature film

Artist Gillian Wearing's first feature-length film has its debut at the Abandon Normal Devices festival next week. 'Self Made' is a compelling exploration of real individuals' lives, their emotional torment and hidden desires.

First Night: Celebration of Mass, Bellahouston Park, Glasgow

Beautifully choreographed, and not too much SuBo
News
University Edible Garden, Leeds – a sustainable garden in the centre of the university, passers-by can help themselves to the home-grown produce
newsFrom a former custard factory to a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery
News
media
News
i100
News
i100
Life and Style
Sainsbury's could roll the lorries out across its whole fleet if they are successful
tech
Arts and Entertainment
tv
Sport
Ojo Onaolapo celebrates winning the bronze medal
commonwealth games
Arts and Entertainment
Rock band Led Zeppelin in the early 1970s
musicLed Zeppelin to release alternative Stairway To Heaven after 43 years
Arts and Entertainment
High-flyer: Chris Pratt in 'Guardians of the Galaxy'
filmHe was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
Arts and Entertainment
'Old Fashioned' will be a different kind of love story to '50 Shades'
film
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
5 best waterproof cameras

Splash and flash: 5 best waterproof cameras

Don't let water stop you taking snaps with one of these machines that will take you from the sand to meters deep
Louis van Gaal interview: Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era

Louis van Gaal interview

Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them altogether

Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them

Jonathon Porritt sounds the alarm
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz