Budapest

Classical review: Imogen Cooper, Ivan Fischer, Budapest Festival

The cadenza in a classical concerto is a curious thing. Originally devised as a way of letting the soloist show off, it became a commentary on the work it adorned, as well as a holiday from it: the soloist could take you on a switchback journey before bringing you safely home. These days, with so many other opportunities for display, its bravura function has faded, so soloists often use it instead as a slot to puff their own wares – as Kennedy does when he injects jazz and Gypsy music into his Brahms.

Fifa president Sepp Blatter promotes 'lovely lady' but delays key

Sepp Blatter's attempts to convince the sceptics that Fifa is actually making progress along its "road map" to reform were cast into further doubt yesterday when football's world governing body announced it was delaying – for another two months – the appointment of independent members to its new investigations unit

More headlines

Hungary in crisis: Tensions with its gypsy population threaten to rip

Gypsies have lived harmoniously in Hungary for five centuries. Yet now, as vigilantes wreak terror upon their communities amid the rise of the far right, new tensions threaten to tear the country apart. Peter Popham travels to a town at the heart of the conflict to find out what's gone so wrong

She Loves Me, Minerva Theatre, Chichester

She Loves Me dates from the same year – 1963 – as "She Loves You", but that's about it all it shares with the Beatles' hit song. This Broadway musical, a firm favourite with buffs of the genre, is set in a Hollywood notion of 1930s Budapest and boasts a tight, witty book by Joe Masteroff and lyrics by Sheldon Harnick that are full of those comic quirks and hypermetrical skids that are present in normal speech but get ironed out in show songs. Jerry Bock's delectably tuneful score is a tribute to an era (which was just about to vanish) when it was possible to be achingly romantic and killingly funny in the same number.