Carey Mulligan

Diary: The girl with the star role

So we now have the first pictures of 25-year-old Rooney Mara in the role of the year: the goth bisexual computer hacker Lisbeth Salander, in David Fincher's English-language version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. The accompanying interview in W magazine does not, I'm afraid, dispel troubling rumours that the stars, Mara and Daniel Craig, will be "doing" Swedish accents in the film. However, Fincher does reveal the names of some of the others who auditioned for the role at a time when any actress seen to have cut her hair was said to be desperate to land it (viz Carey Mulligan, Emma Watson). Natalie Portman, he explains, was too exhausted after shooting three other films back-to-back. Scarlett Johansson was "too sexy". Jennifer Lawrence was "too tall". Mara's winning moment came when she screen-tested a graphic scene, which required her to insert something large into something small belonging to another character. "That's Salander's big scene," said Fincher. "We had to see if they could do it."

Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (12A)

It's been 23 years since the last sighting, but the reappearance of the lesser-spotted Gekko - homo cupiditas boni - can now be confirmed. He's been lesser-spotted for a reason, having spent eight years in jail, and at the start of Oliver Stone's sequel Money Never Sleeps, in 2001, we watch the disgraced Wall Street trader gather up the rubble of his possessions, including a mobile phone the size of a steam-iron, and emerge from the prison gates to be met by... nobody at all. Does Gekko look chastened by his incarceration, or humbled by the absence of greeters? No, he does not. Played, once again, by Michael Douglas, he looks bedraggled, but also hawkish and unillusioned.

'Blomkvist, Mikael Blomkvist'

The financial crisis has left Daniel Craig's most famous alter ego shaken and stirred. But just like James Bond, the British actor is a master of reinvention.

All things bright and beautiful

From animal stripes to kaleidoscopic swirls, prints are everywhere this season, says Harriet Walker. Graphics may seem daunting, but don't be shy

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies gets graphic

Seth Grahame-Smith's Pride and Prejudice and Zombies – first line: "It is a truth universally acknowledged that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains" – rocketed into the top 10 of the New York Times bestseller list when it was released last year, capitalising on zombie culture's recent rising from the dead (Zombieland, starring Woody Harrelson, was released in October; Juno's Diablo Cody is developing a romantic comedy entitled Breathers: A Zombie's Lament).

Cultural Life: Joseph Fiennes, actor

I loved 'An Education'. Rosamund Pike was wonderful in such a small part and Carey Mulligan was just mind-bogglingly brilliant. Tarantino's 'Inglourious Basterds' has one of the best opening scenes.

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Baftas go to Hollywood

American actors and directors are likely to dominate tonight's awards, leaving few chances for British nominees