Arts and Entertainment

From garrulous, gangrenous Jeffrey Bernard to stovepipe-hatted Sebastian Horsley, Soho’s decadents and dandies have proven an entertaining if somewhat trying tribe. Many were far less interesting than their own egos would have them believe, as you’ll know if you ever visited Soho’s notorious Colony Room, a bear pit of strawberry-nosed drunks bellowing witlessly at one another.

Invisible Ink: No 213 - Norman Collins

Authors can be successful in their own right without impinging on the consciousness of an attention-deficient public, whose recall-rate of virals featuring inadequate Russian driving skills is above works by novelists who bring a lifetime of experience to their craft. Equally, critics will ignore writers who they consider solid and old-fashioned in favour of current literary darlings.

Invisible Ink: No 212 - Walter Starkie

Authors can be successful in their own right without impinging on the consciousness of an attention-deficient public, whose recall-rate of virals featuring inadequate Russian driving skills is above works by novelists who bring a lifetime of experience to their craft. Equally, critics will ignore writers who they consider solid and old-fashioned in favour of current literary darlings.

Invisible Ink: No 210 - Percy F Westerman

Authors can be successful in their own right without impinging on the consciousness of an attention-deficient public, whose recall-rate of virals featuring inadequate Russian driving skills is above works by novelists who bring a lifetime of experience to their craft. Equally, critics will ignore writers who they consider solid and old-fashioned in favour of current literary darlings.

Invisible Ink: No 210 - Percy F Westerman

Charles Dickens wasn’t the only Portsmouth-born writer to become a superstar, but while Charles was fiddling about with rewrites and plot structures, Percy Westerman was hammering out adventures at an unbelievable rate of knots.

The News Matrix: Tuesday 4 February 2014

Hacking reporter hits out at NOTW

Invisible Ink: No 209 - Raymond Durgnat

Looking back from the present, when serious film critics are more embattled than ever before owing to the egalitarianism of the internet, we can see that Raymond Durgnat was a unique voice. Born in 1932 to Swiss parents, he became one of the first post-graduates of film in Britain. Thorold Dickinson, the director of Gaslight, acted as his mentor, and Durgnat began to write for the major film publications, although he fell out with Sight & Sound (after Gavin Lambert left to head for Hollywood), accusing the magazine of elitism, overt politicisation, snobbery and pretentiousness – charges which still arise against it today.

Book review: In the Wolf's Mouth by Adam Foulds

Adam Foulds’s last novel, The Quickening Maze, was a truly superb study in madness and early psychiatric methods, combining the intellectual and the visceral in often startling ways (few will forget his description of the “dismantling” of a deer). In this latest work, he retains that powerful blend and focuses on another kind of madness: the madness of war.

Jared Leto in 'Dallas Buyers Club'

Jared Leto in Dallas Buyers Club: Why can't we cast trans people in trans roles?

When will TV and film start opening the door to transgender actors, asks Paris Lees

'Penis soup is something I'll treasure for ever': Adventurer Simon Reeve reveals the most stomach-churning dishes he's encountered

My stomach has endured the full scope of awful foods this planet has to offer Trying adventurous food is a big part of travelling, but India, where I'm travelling through now, has more problems with [food] hygiene than anywhere else in the world. It's a cultural problem, as eating meat is a rarity in rural areas, so they treat it like a vegetable, keeping it in a cupboard. So when the occasional Westerner passes through, by the time it's pulled out, it's been in there for a few months. When travelling across poorer parts of India now, I try to survive off rice and dahl.

Indyplus video: Big Ballet, Channel 4

DVD & Blu-ray reviews: Cutie and the Boxer, Prisoners, Last Passenger, Sbout Time, Girl Most Likely

Cutie and the Boxer (E) Zachary Heinzerling, DVD (82mins)

Travel agenda

From Ben Fogle's shore excursions to a new Hemingway hotel in Madrid, and discounted family rail travel in the UK

Hungary appetite: Budapest appealed to Jenna Coleman

My life in travel: Jenna Coleman

'I love the bars, thermal baths and laid-back feel of Budapest in summer'

Out Of The Furnace, film review: Christian Bale feels the heat on brotherly quest

(15) Dir. Scott Cooper; Starring Christian Bale, Woody Harrelson, 117mins

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