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A British-born chief executive has hit the Silicon Valley jackpot for the second time in his career after selling US social media analytics firm Topsy to Apple for a reported $200m (£122m).

Topsy: who are they and why did Apple buy them?

Apple's $200 million acquisition of the Twitter anlaytics company has raised questions about the company's interest in social media

James Weeks and Areeb Amani get to work at UTC Reading

The school that really means business: UTC Reading is preparing pupils for the world of work

Corporate sponsors, suits instead of uniforms and houses replaced by ‘companies’ show how one of the new UTCs is putting work first

Investment Insider: Look at the US to fill gaps in your portfolio

Sometimes there are just no British equivalents to some American companies

The Business Matrix: Thursday 13 June 2013

Monarch  takes flight

Impressive range: the Linksys x3500 router

A Week With: The Linksys x3500 router

Make life a little less complex

James Ashton: Size matters, so Britain must grow big businesses to feed our economy

A confluence of events reminded me of the real challenge Britain faces to reboot itself as a nation of entrepreneurs. I emerged on Wednesday from a persuasive briefing with Santander's boss Ana Botin on her campaign to recruit more small-business customers to read an email reporting that a little-known company called Ubiquisys had been sold.

Derek Pain: Nighthawk oil punt that left me in the dark

No Pain, No Gain
Scott Forstall demonstrating the new map application during the 2012 Apple WWDC keynote address in San Francisco in June 2012

iPhone Maps clash leads to departure of top Apple executive

A high profile row over how to handle the fallout from the disastrous launch of Apple’s iOS Maps service has led to the resignation of the company’s Senior Vice-President of iOS Software, the Wall Street Journal claims today.

Zhang Tingzhen, who is unable to speak or walk properly, with his parents in Shenzhen hospital

iPhone factory 'threatened to cut funding for disabled man'

Foxconn plant in China wanted brain-damaged man to take disability assessment, say family

Financial markets: A temporary software glitch earlier this month cost Nasdaq more than $40m during the flotation of Facebook’s shares. The US tech stock exchange had to compensate investors who were unable to buy shares when the market opened

Facebook launch 'cost UBS £227m'

Banking group UBS claimed today that the botched stock market listing of social networking giant Facebook cost it 349 million Swiss francs (£227 million).

Silicon Valley Bank opens UK branch

A US-based bank dedicated to supporting firms in the technology sector today opened its first UK branch.

A new generation of STEM skilled youngsters can use the games as a platform for new careers

On your marks: London 2012 gears up to launch new technical careers

It’s all about the sport, but behind the scenes, the Olympic and Paralympic games are powered by people with technology, science, engineering and maths skills, says Rhodri Marsden

James Cusick: From Sicily to the US courts – the trail of evidence could hit Murdoch where it hurts

News Corporation cannot afford to put a foot wrong. However uncomfortable the fallout from the phone-hacking scandal has been for Rupert Murdoch in the UK, wider questions about the way News Corp has been governed now hold the potential to do serious damage to the company's global brand.

Murdoch offloads TV technology firm NDS

Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation has offloaded its remaining stake in NDS, a satellite TV technology provider where computer hacking allegations have returned to haunt its former parent company.

Chosen to help make the Games happen

Competitors may make the headlines, but what happens behind the scenes at the London 2012 Games is just as important. That’s because these Olympic and Paralympic Games aim to be the most technologically connected Games possible, reaching a vast global audience of billions through a multitude of media channels.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent