Keeping pace with the London 2012 Games

When success is measured in 100ths of a second, it’s imperative that the network infrastructure technology for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games is fit for purpose. Cisco, as a proud supporter of London 2012, has played a key part to ensure that it is.

Chosen to help make the Games happen

Competitors may make the headlines, but what happens behind the scenes at the London 2012 Games is just as important. That’s because these Olympic and Paralympic Games aim to be the most technologically connected Games possible, reaching a vast global audience of billions through a multitude of media channels.

Poised to deliver the network infrastructure for London 2012

While athletes the world over prepare for the performance of a lifetime, in London, one race has already begun. For the past three years, a small army of strategists and technicians has been hard at work, putting the network infrastructure technology in place for what aims to be one of the biggest and most connected events the world has ever seen.

The jacket that defines Britain

Everywhere Mat Snow looks, he sees people in jeans and North Face jackets. Why are we dressed to depress? It's our duty to be flamboyant in times of recession, he argues – not a nation of black-clad Calvinists

The Net Delusion: How Not To Liberate The World, By Evgeny Morozov

In the world theatre of geopolitics, where hubris sometimes seems like the only hit production running, Hilary Clinton's "Internet Freedom" speech of January 2010 deserves some kind of special award. Drawing a parallel between the Iron Curtain of the Cold War and the "information curtain descending across much of the world", the US Secretary of State praised "viral videos and blog posts" as "the samizdat of our day... We need to put these tools in the hands of people around the world who will use them to advance democracy and human rights".

Can you look her in the iPad?

We're more aware than ever of where our food and fashions come from. But few of us consider the human cost of the latest must-have gadgets. It's about time we did, says Nick Harding

The new generation of enterprising entrepreneurs

Fancy yourself as the next James Dyson? You could come up with a design and promote it on YouTube – but if you want your device to succeed, there's a lot of work ahead, entrepreneurs tell Simon Usborne

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The company that turned 'disability' into an asset

When Thorkil Sonne was told that his three-year-old son had autism, the Danish IT specialist ran the classic gamut of responses for parents of an autistic child, from anger that a doctor could burden his happy boy with the label of a lifelong disability, to a desire to learn everything about the condition.

US Customs may be forced to leave electronic devices alone

Mohamed Shommo, an engineer for Cisco Systems, travels overseas several times a year for work, so he is accustomed to opening his bags for border inspections upon returning to the US. But in recent years, these inspections have gone much deeper than his luggage.

Race for the presidency: The colour of money

As the downturn continues in the US, the race for the White House will be won by the candidate who does the best job of convincing voters that he has the right answers to their economic woes. No wonder both John McCain and Barack Obama are desperate to win the endorsements of the nation's leading business figures