Arts and Entertainment Robert Plant performs with the Sensational Space Shifters

For a Led Zeppelin reunion refusenik, Robert Plant does perform an awful lot of material by the group who defined seventies rock in all its magnificence and occasional self-indulgence.

Letter: Reasonable price of a night at the opera

Sir: Your leading article about the remarkable Barbra Streisand (20 April) refers to her ability to command seat prices 'of which Glyndebourne would be proud'.

PRODUCTION NOTES / What happens when the star pulls out of the concert? This. . .

Last week, on the morning of a heavily publicised recital, the soprano Dawn Upshaw was forced to withdraw due to ill health. William Lyne, director of the Wigmore Hall, describes the problems arising from cancellations:

Music: Pumping up the volume: Nick Kimberley reviews Glenn Branca at the Queen Elizabeth Hall and Michael Nyman at the Barbican Hall

The words 'technology' and 'music' sometimes seem antithetical, the one inhuman, the other redemptively human. Yet it is technology that, historically, has made music possible, whether supplanting the fortepiano with the extended sonorities of the pianoforte, for example; or offering up the awesome possibilities of the full-blown symphony orchestra. One of technology's happiest gifts has been extra volume, yet in our own time, few composers have exploited the most obvious means of cranking up the volume: amplification.

MUSIC / Thrills, not frills Heart of the matter: Adrian Jack on Margaret Price's recital of Ruckert songs at the Wigmore Hall

Dame Margaret Price is one of Britain's top sopranos, yet, as a recitalist, there's something down- to-earth about her stage manner that you may find refreshing or disappointing, according to taste. While she's a very classy singer, she doesn't trade in glamour.

MUSIC / A firm grip on Schubert: Adrian Jack reviews Andras Schiff's concert of Schubert piano sonatas at the Wigmore Hall

WITH HIS Wigmore Hall series surveying important strands in the chamber and solo piano repertoire, Andras Schiff is becoming a musical institution in his own right. He's currently near the end of playing 18 of what he calls the 'more or less complete' works in Schubert's rather confusing legacy of solo piano sonatas. The basis of Schiff's selection is characteristically pragmatic and reasonable; he's not playing fragments either as they remain or in completions by other people.

MUSIC / Soile Isokoski - Wigmore Hall, London

She opened seraphically with Mozart's Ridente la calma, as supple as mercury. Soile Isokoski will be a soprano phenomenon of the Nineties, and there were many professionals present on Thursday checking the state of her art.

PROMS: BBC Singers / Holten - Royal Albert Hall / Radio 3

The BBC Singers' late-night Prom spanned almost 500 years of vocal music, from Josquin Desprez, the great master of the early Renaissance, to works by living composers. Both Arvo Part and John Tavener have become cult figures, largely on the basis of their extraordinarily rich output of religiously inspired choral music, although it is surely its atmospheric, minimalistic stillness that has proved appealing in this secular age. The Singers are perhaps unrivalled in their approach to contemporary works: Part's Seven Magnificat Antiphons had been revised for the occasion and dedicated to guest conductor, Bo Holten, under whose direction they gave a committed performance.

MUSIC / LSO / Hickox - Barbican Hall

Both Tippett's oratorio A Child of Our Time and Gershwin's opera Porgy and Bess declare their composers' identification with the down-trodden and the oppressed by borrowing musical symbols from black culture - rather surprisingly so in the case of Tippett, whose use of spirituals paralleling Bach's of Lutheran chorales, although by now a locus classicus, still sounds movingly fresh.
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