Colombo

Emilio Colombo

Further to Rupert Cornwell's obituary of Emilio Colombo (4 July), early in 1976 as prime minister of Italy – flanked by his friend Aldo Moro, then foreign secretary and soon to be brutally murdered by terrorists – Colombo came to a meeting of the Parliamentary Labour Party to beg us to send a delegation to the indirectly elected European Parliament, writes Tam Dalyell. Later, as president of that body, he developed excellent relations with the leader of the British Labour delegation, the former foreign secretary Michael Stewart, and with James Scott-Hopkins, who led the Conservatives.

Emilio Colombo: Politician who helped shape modern Europe

Apart perhaps from Giulio Andreotti, his fellow Christian Democrat and occasional rival who died seven weeks before him, no single politician embodied the history of postwar Italy, with all its successes and failures, more completely than Emilio Colombo.

World Twenty20 round-up: India crash out while Pakistan progress

Australia sustained a 32-run defeat in their final Super Eights match against Pakistan yesterday, but were still able to celebrate a place in the World Twenty20 semi-finals alongside their conquerors as India went out despite beating South Africa in Group F's other game.

Colombo on course for Coventry

If conditions do not improve before Tuesday, then he might need all the navigation skills of his namesake. But it is the bookmakers who will struggle to keep their heads above water at Royal Ascot if Cristoforo Colombo can land its first major plunge on the opening day.

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The Cat's Table, By Michael Ondaatje

The last time Michael Ondaatje visited Sri Lanka in a novel was in 2000 with Anil's Ghost where, through a series of fragmented narratives, he presented a story of waste in a time of war. Now he returns. Only on this occasion it is not modern Sri Lanka with which he deals, but the lost and mythical island called Ceylon, a country as foreign as the past, and as extinct as the dinosaur. Ondaatje is both poet and novelist and his use of English is elegant and beautiful. He writes, not in the worn-out clichés that are current in Sri Lanka, but with a feel for an international language that post-Ceylonese nationalism tried hard to strip from the education system of a whole generation.