Ellie Harrington of Duck Egg Designs

Capital keeps pulling in cash

Demand from new occupiers in London and the flow of money into the capital is showing no signs of ending, according to property company Great Portland Estates.

Gage: he belonged to a generation of scholars that saw a wide span of historical knowledge and engagement with foreign-language cultures as essential to art history's standing as a science

John Gage: Art historian who established himself as anunrivalled scholar of Turner

The art history world has suffered a grievous loss in the person of John Gage, who has died at the age of 73. A scholar of immense range and erudition, he will beremembered chiefly for his ground-breaking contributions to the study of JMW Turner and to the history of colour. His 1987 monograph, JMW Turner: A Wonderful Range of Mind, stands out as much the finest account of the artist and of the visual and intellectual interests that shaped his work. Colour and Culture: Practice and Meaning fromAntiquity to Abstraction (1993), the fruit of more than 30 years' research andreflection, established him unquestionably as the pre-eminent historian of artistic uses and theories of colour in western cultures. Translated into five languages, the book is the standard reference source on the subject andhas found a wide readership outside academia. In 1994 it received theprestigious Mitchell Prize for the History of Art.

Michael Glover: Nostalgia as mundane as this doesn't come cheap

It reeks of a kind of nostalgia, opening a scruffy, squeaky door to an entire gone world

Great Works: The Beach at Trouville, 1875 (12.5cm x 24.5cm), Eugène Boudin

The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

Restoring Rubens' Cain Slaying Abel

An epic campaign of restoration of Rubens' masterpiece is underway at the Courtauld Institute of Art. The Independent Online talks to the restorers and reveals the progress in pictures

Sir Denis Mahon: Art collector who fought for free admission charges and against the sale of works from public collections

Following the recent death of the Duke of Grafton we have lost, with the death of Denis Mahon, the last of that generation of men of independent means who dedicated their lives to the public good. Grandson of the 5th Marquess of Sligo and a beneficiary of the Guinness Mahon merchant bank, Denis Mahon was educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read history and took tutorials from Kenneth Clark, who in turn introduced him to Nikolaus Pevsner, then teaching at the Courtauld Institute. Pevsner had previously researched Milanese Seicento (17th century) painting and he suggested that Mahon should study the neglected Bolognese painter Giovanni Francesco Barbieri, Il Guercino.

Just <u>one</u> university will escape funding cuts

All bar one of England's 130 universities had their spending slashed for the next academic year yesterday.

Nicholas Penny: 'The rising cost of art could create a national divide'

Monday Interview: The National Gallery's director, tells Rob Sharp why it's too expensive to take the museum's best-known works to the regions

Universities to charge more than £6,000 under new proposals

Every English university will have to charge students more than £6,000 a year to maintain standards under the Government's new fees regime, according to a new analysis published today.

Richard Walker: Art historian who became Curator of the Palace of Westminster

It was a characteristically modest and exact description; Richard Walker knew better than anyone the art of cataloguing, describing what he saw economically and precisely, yet evoking the picture as vividly as if you could see it.

Imogen Poots: A bright young thing who won't suffer for her art

She's brainy and beautiful, and a rising British acting talent with a clutch of upcoming risqué roles, but don't expect a tortured soul with cigarette in hand. Rachel Shields meets Imogen Poots.

Dr Michael Creeth: Scientist who helped pave the way for Watson and Crick

Michael Creeth had a long and distinguished scientific career and made a significant contribution to one of the greatest scientific discoveries of the last century, when as a young PhD student his experiments confirmed the existence of the special bonds known as hydrogen bonds which hold the two strands of the DNA molecule together. This finding, based on measurements of the viscosity of highly purified solutions of DNA, was published in 1947 and proved crucial for the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the double helix six years later by James Watson and Francis Crick.

Couple settle after their 'Titian' was sold for a song

Dispute with Christie's after painting worth millions was bought for &pound;8,000

Michelangelo's Dream, Courtauld Institute, London

A breathtaking collection of drawings outlines the intriguing back story of the artist's dangerous desire
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

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Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones