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Italian luxury notebook maker Moleskine has picked Canary Wharf and Covent Garden for its first standalone UK stores.

Katherine Jenkins performs at Epsom in June 2012

Katherine Jenkins: 'I'm hooked on Downton Abbey and Homeland'

Cultural Life: The singer on her favourite music, film, tv and theatre picks

Kara Shay Thomson performs in New York City Opera's production of Schoenberg's 'Erwartung'

New York City Opera needs to raise millions fast– or the fat lady sings

70-year-old company says it plans to file for bankruptcy unless it manages to reach its fundraising goal

Director General Lord Hall on his first day of work, back in April

Lord Hall: The Director-General who pledged to clean up BBC told to return cash

MPs tell Tony Hall to pay back £24,500 he received when he quit for Royal Opera House in 2001

Andris Nelsons and Kristine Opolais

Opera's double act: Kristine Opolais and Andris Nelsons

It's a family affair at the Proms. The Latvian soprano Kristine Opolais, 33, will be conducted by her husband Andris Nelsons (both left) of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. She will perform Desdemona's “Willow Song” and “Ave Maria” from Act 3 of Verdi's 1887 opera Otello and Tatyana's letter scene from Tchaikovsky's 1879 opera Eugene Onegin.

Simon Callow says he is fascinated by Wagner’s ‘monstrous personality’

Simon Callow gets inside the ‘anti-Semitic, psychotic’ head of Wagner for one-man show

The actor Simon Callow has promised to take audiences to a “dark, murky, unsettling place”, with a new one-man stage show that explores the composer Richard Wagner’s “toxic” and “disgusting” anti-Semitism.

Premier Inn to launch compact 'city centre' spin-off chain

No-frills hotel group Premier Inn is to launch a new compact “city centre” spin-off chain, with bedrooms that have an area of just 11.4 square metres each.

David Wall pictured in 1984

Ballet dancer David Wall dies of cancer aged 67

He was the Royal Ballet's youngest male principal at 21 and danced with Dame Margot Fonteyn

The Apprentice winner Tom Pellereau and his 12-day old daughter demonstrate the Nipper Clipper

The Apprentice 2012 winner Tom Pellereau turns talons to safe nail-clippers for babies

Apprentice boffin Tom Pellereau is hoping his latest invention is up to scratch as he unveiled a safe nail-clipper for babies.

Christopher's, 18 Wellington Street London WC2

How many restaurants which survive for more than 10 years are actually any good? In the restless churn of the London food scene, the answer is arguably: not very many. Chefs move on, managers are poached, the owner loses interest and that exciting new concept grows as stale as last week's leftovers. Inevitably, the sizzle subsides and the quality drops. At which point, it's only a matter of time before the nice chap from Cote, or Jamie's Italian, or Bill's comes knocking to ask about the lease.

Banksy’s Slave Labour should be ‘returned to its rightful place’ in north London, says the local MP

'Disappeared' Banksy set to sell for £900,000

A mural which disappeared from the wall of a north London shop last year but resurfaced  in an auction in Miami – only  to be withdrawn at the last minute – has gone on sale in London and was on Sunday evening expected to raise £900,000.

New house price figures show London continues to be a driving force

Annual house price increases in England were driven by a 7.6% rise in London and a 3.3% increase in the South East

Australian cricket fans during a Test match at Lord’s

Strewth mate. Aussies wave goodbye to Britain as it becomes too pricey to stay

The recession has seen Australian expats leave in droves, damaging a specialist economy

Newsman: Tom Bradby in The Agenda studio

Tom Bradby steps out of Kate and Wills' shadow

It's two years since that interview, and now the 'Agenda' host has two feature films in the offing

Cosi fan tutte, English Touring Opera
Hackney Empire, London

Embarking on its spring tour with a new production of Cosi fan tutte, ETO offers its audiences a typically provocative essay by the late Edward Said, as a way of intellectually limbering up.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent