News The building on Pioneer Ave. that houses Sophidea, the company that received a deluge of Chinese Internet traffic Tuesday

'If you monkey with a system that’s supposed to provide global connectivity, it’s very easy to make mistakes'

Serendipity Enigmatic variations

HAVING just written a book on the history of cryptography, I wondered if serendipity had ever resulted in the unravelling of a secret code. Nothing came to mind immediately, but eventually I realised that one of the milestones in the history of codebreaking occurred when theologians stumbled upon a technique that destroyed a hitherto uncrackable code.

Lockheed deal

Lockheed deal

Hi-tech virus hits Asia

THE SO-CALLED Chernobyl computer virus struck hundreds of thousands of computers in Asia and the Middle East this week, with Turkey and South Korea each reporting 300,000 computers infected. Home users in the United States were also affected, but there were few problems with corporate computers.

Letter: Curb MI5

Sir: Andreas Whittham Smith overlooks a number of key issues about the destiny of MI5's files on UK citizens ("Should we keep our secrets?" 24 September.)

Outlook: Barclaycard

THE CREDIT-CARD business is money for old rope. How could it be otherwise when base rates are 7.5 per cent and yet card issuers can get away with charging their customers compound rates of 23 per cent? Barclaycard has sat at the top of the pile for the last 30 years, growing fat on a mixture of customer inertia and competitive apathy.

Hacker diverts phones for maths

Hacker diverts phones for maths

Hackers make war on Net paedophiles

COMPUTER hackers are becoming cyber vigilantes, in an attempt to rid the Internet of paedophiles trading in child pornography, by passing on details to the police or naming and shaming those involved.

US spy satellite blows up on launch

A ROCKET carrying a top-secret spy satellite exploded seconds after blast-off from Cape Canaveral yesterday, the United States Air Force said.

Money: Sometimes the bank teller tells dreadful tales

Innocent bank customers making unexplained transactions of just a few hundred pounds may be investigated by a police agency created to combat drug dealers and football hooligans. Paul Slade reports.

Start using encryption now, and maybe it won't be outlawed

Secure encryption on the Internet is the key to confidence for people wanting to buy and sell goods and services online. But the US government is worried that secrecy could help terrorists and other undesirables, and is insisting on holding keys to the codes. While the argument rages, Charles Arthur suggests, readers should try out encryption for themselves.

Curbs on cold-calling

Cold calling by telephone sales companies could face tough curbs under proposals unveiled yesterday by Oftel, the phones watchdog and the Data Protection Registrar.

Letter: Spooks can be prosecuted

Sir: Your comments ("pounds 1.4bn pile of junk through the letterbox", 17 July) on the latest annual report from the Data Protection Registrar quote the registrar's intention to examine "whether some aspects of the work of the intelligence services could be brought into the data protection fold", because "crime fighting ... may well fall under data protection laws", but omit reference to the most crucial element of his long-standing issue.

Without strong encryption, government can pretty reliably track virtually every personal datum we possess

War is peace. Peace is war. To protect your privacy, we must be able to read all your private communications.

Length is the secret for code security

At the heart of modern data encryption systems are sophisticated cryptographic keys. Based on complex mathematical algorithms, the keys enable information to be encoded by senders before transmission. Only a person in possession of the correct key can then decode the message and read its contents.

Decrypts reopen Holocaust debate

Decrypts reopen Holocaust debate
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Laid bare: the Good2Go app ensures people have a chance to make their intentions clear about having sex
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Richard Burr remains the baker to beat on the Great British Bake Off
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Amazon has added a cautionary warning to Tom and Jerry cartoons on its streaming service
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The village was originally named Llansanffraid-ym-Mechain after the Celtic female Saint Brigit, but the name was changed 150 years ago to Llansantffraid – a decision which suggests the incorrect gender of the saint
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Prices correct as of 26 September 2014
Italian couples fake UK divorce scam on an ‘industrial scale’

Welcome to Maidenhead, the divorce capital of... Italy

A look at the the legal tourists who exploited our liberal dissolution rules
Time to stop running: At the start of Yom Kippur and with anti-Semitism flourishing, one Jew can no longer ignore his identity

Time to stop running

At the start of Yom Kippur and with anti-Semitism flourishing, one Jew can no longer ignore his identity
Tom and Jerry cartoons now carry a 'racial prejudice' warning on Amazon

Tom and Jerry cartoons now carry a 'racial prejudice' warning on Amazon

The vintage series has often been criticised for racial stereotyping
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An app for the amorous

Could Good2Go end disputes about sexual consent - without being a passion-killer?
Llansanffraid is now Llansantffraid. Welsh town changes its name, but can you spot the difference?

Llansanffraid is now Llansantffraid

Welsh town changes its name, but can you spot the difference?
Charlotte Riley: At the peak of her powers

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After a few early missteps with Chekhov, her acting career has taken her to Hollywood. Next up is a role in the BBC’s gangster drama ‘Peaky Blinders’
She's having a laugh: Britain's female comedians have never had it so good

She's having a laugh

Britain's female comedians have never had it so good, says stand-up Natalie Haynes
Sistine Chapel to ‘sing’ with new LED lights designed to bring Michelangelo’s masterpiece out of the shadows

Let there be light

Sistine Chapel to ‘sing’ with new LEDs designed to bring Michelangelo’s masterpiece out of the shadows
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Tensions rise in Bake Off's pastry week

Richard remains the baker to beat as Chetna begins to flake
Paris Fashion Week, spring/summer 2015: Time travel fashion at Louis Vuitton in Paris

A look to the future

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The 10 best bedspreads

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Arsenal vs Galatasaray

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Stuart Lancaster’s long-term deal makes sense – a rarity for a decision taken by the RFU

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The children orphaned by Ebola...

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US film censors have ruled 'Pride' unfit for under-16s, though it contains no sex or violence