News Police search the home of Adam Lanza

Some of the most important clues about what drove Adam Lanza to mass murder probably sit on the computer that the reclusive, technical-minded 20-year-old used as one of his main contacts with the world, law enforcement authorities said.

Brut force: The Lille Art Museum extension

The Lille Art Museum has reopened with a new extension for its collection of Art Brut. The building is a radical addition, but it could have been even more daring, says Jay Merrick

Architecture and our duty to beauty

We all have a responsibility to make the best of our surroundings. Yet the political classes are reluctant to be arbiters of taste. That has to change, argues Julian Baggini

On the agenda: London International Animation Festival; Getty Images Gallery; Gossip Girl; Open House London weekend; Ian Rankin; Un-Convention

We're off to market to see Diana Dors and getting an Edinburgh tour from Ian Rankin

Ravaged cities of Russia get Koolhaas cure

Moscow has a reputation as a chaotic, ugly city where anything goes when it comes to construction. In recent times, architectural and aesthetic values have taken a back seat to business interests.

Shock of the Nouvel

From this year's scarlet Serpentine Pavilion to a disputed tower in New York, controversy follows Jean Nouvel around – that's the secret of the architect's success, says Jay Merrick

Album: Thomas Larcher, Madhares (ECM)

There's an overwhelming sense of restrictive unease in these three works by the young Austrian composer Thomas Larcher, particularly in Böse Zellen (Malign Cells), a piano and orchestra piece dramatically rendered by Tim Fellner with the Münchener Kammerorchester under Dennis Russell Davies. The preparation of the piano strings with rubber wedges and adhesive tape allows just a series of dulled but spiky taps, a muted gamelan accompanied by swells and subsidences of brass and woodwind. It's as if the piano is struggling to break free of its restrictions, until the tape is finally pulled off effecting a huge, unfocused polyphonic cluster which overwhelms the entire piece. The Madhares are less architecturally intriguing, but no less gripping.

Mac gallery: Added spice for a Midlands hotbed

The vibrant new Mac gallery deserves to put the seal on Birmingham's bid to be UK City of Culture, says Jay Merrick

Why Yemen's future threatens to destroy its past

As the government in Sana'a diverts funds to fight al-Qa'ida, the city's historic architecture crumbles. Hugh Macleod reports

Hot metal: Anthony Caro's sculpture is showing a wonderful late flowering of creativity and spirituality

The Irish poet WB Yeats asked, "Why should not old men be mad?" as he frolicked through his old age, writing some of the most wild and exuberant poems of his life. Is the sculptor Anthony Caro, who celebrated his 86th birthday on 8 March, such another? I kept on asking myself this as I walked around a new show of his sculptures in the West End of London.

McQueen collection wins design award

Alexander McQueen has posthumously won a top design award for his spring and summer 2010 fashion collection.

Gordon Michell: Architect and conservationist celebrated for his work in the field of urban regeneration

Gordon Michell will be remembered best for his work in the field of urban regeneration, for which he was appointed OBE in 1985, but during his long and distinguished professional career he played an important role in a number of influential projects.

Weekend Arts: Zaha hits Rome

This weekend the starchitect unveils her latest project, Maxxi, a museum of modern art. Jay Merrick gets a sneak preview – and is stunned

Observations: Toy story shows Ernö's still the man with the golden touch

Ernö Goldfinger – the architectural establishment's favourite villain (the inspiration for his Bond-baddy-namesake, no less) – was not just the man behind Brutalism's favourite behemoth, Trellick Tower in London's Kensington. He also had a softer side. Just look at the exhibition currently showing at Hampstead's 2 Willow Road (Goldfinger's one-time home and now a National Trust property). It features the architect's lesser-known work on Abbatt's toy shop, a Wimpole Street outlet best-known as an exemplar of 1930s Modernism, containing many a twee treat too. "It was more of a gallery built at child-height," says the curator Jane Audas. "It was full of traditional wooden toys sourced from all over the world and sharp children's furniture."

Rice's Architectural Primer, By Matthew Rice

Can you tell a flying buttress from a vast iron member? Do you know the difference between an oeil de boeuf window and a fanlight? Do you think crocketing and tracery are something to do with needlework? And would you place a poodle at an Aedicule opening?

Glasgow's big 'Mac' in architectural feeding frenzy

9,000 entries for £50m art school project
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A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

In the final part of our series, Chris Green arrives in Glasgow - a host city struggling to keep the politics out of its celebration of sport
Out in the cold: A writer spends a night on the streets and hears the stories of the homeless

A writer spends a night on the streets

Rough sleepers - the homeless, the destitute and the drunk - exist in every city. Will Nicoll meets those whose luck has run out
Striking new stations, high-speed links and (whisper it) better services - the UK's railways are entering a new golden age

UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

Conchita becomes a 'bride' on Paris catwalk

Alexander Fury salutes the Eurovision Song Contest winner's latest triumph
Pétanque World Championship in Marseilles hit by

Pétanque 'world cup' hit by death threats

This year's most acrimonious sporting event took place in France, not Brazil. How did pétanque get so passionate?
Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

Why did we stop eating whelks?

Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
10 best women's sunglasses

In the shade: 10 best women's sunglasses

From luxury bespoke eyewear to fun festival sunnies, we round up the shades to be seen in this summer
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

World Cup final: Messi? Mascherano is key for Argentina...

No 10 is always centre of attention but Barça team-mate is just as crucial to finalists’ hopes
Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

18-year-old says this month’s Commonwealth Games are a key staging post in her career before time slips away
The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

Can scientists save our sea life?

By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice