News Police search the home of Adam Lanza

Some of the most important clues about what drove Adam Lanza to mass murder probably sit on the computer that the reclusive, technical-minded 20-year-old used as one of his main contacts with the world, law enforcement authorities said.

Brut force: The Lille Art Museum extension

The Lille Art Museum has reopened with a new extension for its collection of Art Brut. The building is a radical addition, but it could have been even more daring, says Jay Merrick

Architecture and our duty to beauty

We all have a responsibility to make the best of our surroundings. Yet the political classes are reluctant to be arbiters of taste. That has to change, argues Julian Baggini

On the agenda: London International Animation Festival; Getty Images Gallery; Gossip Girl; Open House London weekend; Ian Rankin; Un-Convention

We're off to market to see Diana Dors and getting an Edinburgh tour from Ian Rankin

Ravaged cities of Russia get Koolhaas cure

Moscow has a reputation as a chaotic, ugly city where anything goes when it comes to construction. In recent times, architectural and aesthetic values have taken a back seat to business interests.

Shock of the Nouvel

From this year's scarlet Serpentine Pavilion to a disputed tower in New York, controversy follows Jean Nouvel around – that's the secret of the architect's success, says Jay Merrick

Album: Thomas Larcher, Madhares (ECM)

There's an overwhelming sense of restrictive unease in these three works by the young Austrian composer Thomas Larcher, particularly in Böse Zellen (Malign Cells), a piano and orchestra piece dramatically rendered by Tim Fellner with the Münchener Kammerorchester under Dennis Russell Davies. The preparation of the piano strings with rubber wedges and adhesive tape allows just a series of dulled but spiky taps, a muted gamelan accompanied by swells and subsidences of brass and woodwind. It's as if the piano is struggling to break free of its restrictions, until the tape is finally pulled off effecting a huge, unfocused polyphonic cluster which overwhelms the entire piece. The Madhares are less architecturally intriguing, but no less gripping.

Mac gallery: Added spice for a Midlands hotbed

The vibrant new Mac gallery deserves to put the seal on Birmingham's bid to be UK City of Culture, says Jay Merrick

Why Yemen's future threatens to destroy its past

As the government in Sana'a diverts funds to fight al-Qa'ida, the city's historic architecture crumbles. Hugh Macleod reports

Hot metal: Anthony Caro's sculpture is showing a wonderful late flowering of creativity and spirituality

The Irish poet WB Yeats asked, "Why should not old men be mad?" as he frolicked through his old age, writing some of the most wild and exuberant poems of his life. Is the sculptor Anthony Caro, who celebrated his 86th birthday on 8 March, such another? I kept on asking myself this as I walked around a new show of his sculptures in the West End of London.

McQueen collection wins design award

Alexander McQueen has posthumously won a top design award for his spring and summer 2010 fashion collection.

Gordon Michell: Architect and conservationist celebrated for his work in the field of urban regeneration

Gordon Michell will be remembered best for his work in the field of urban regeneration, for which he was appointed OBE in 1985, but during his long and distinguished professional career he played an important role in a number of influential projects.

Weekend Arts: Zaha hits Rome

This weekend the starchitect unveils her latest project, Maxxi, a museum of modern art. Jay Merrick gets a sneak preview – and is stunned

Observations: Toy story shows Ernö's still the man with the golden touch

Ernö Goldfinger – the architectural establishment's favourite villain (the inspiration for his Bond-baddy-namesake, no less) – was not just the man behind Brutalism's favourite behemoth, Trellick Tower in London's Kensington. He also had a softer side. Just look at the exhibition currently showing at Hampstead's 2 Willow Road (Goldfinger's one-time home and now a National Trust property). It features the architect's lesser-known work on Abbatt's toy shop, a Wimpole Street outlet best-known as an exemplar of 1930s Modernism, containing many a twee treat too. "It was more of a gallery built at child-height," says the curator Jane Audas. "It was full of traditional wooden toys sourced from all over the world and sharp children's furniture."

Rice's Architectural Primer, By Matthew Rice

Can you tell a flying buttress from a vast iron member? Do you know the difference between an oeil de boeuf window and a fanlight? Do you think crocketing and tracery are something to do with needlework? And would you place a poodle at an Aedicule opening?

Glasgow's big 'Mac' in architectural feeding frenzy

9,000 entries for £50m art school project
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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness