News Police search the home of Adam Lanza

Some of the most important clues about what drove Adam Lanza to mass murder probably sit on the computer that the reclusive, technical-minded 20-year-old used as one of his main contacts with the world, law enforcement authorities said.

Stina Backer: Why does a little snow cause such chaos?

To a born-and-bred Viking like myself, it never ceases to amaze how much fuss a few flakes can create in this country. It's not like it never snows here. In fact, during my eight years in Britain, it has snowed during each and every one.

Coventry's architectural revival

The cathedral's newest neighbour is a museum – and it sets the spirits soaring, says Jay Merrick

Observations: Savile Row does it with style, but Hermès is just horrible

Mayfair has gained two new pieces of public art. One is of the highest quality; the other is glorified window-dressing. First, the quality. Savile Row, London's buttoned-up bastion of tailored existence, has been given a faintly surreal vibe by Verge, a gangling two-ton bronze sculpture created by the American artist, Joel Shapiro. The piece floats a few feet in front of the façade of No 23, a new building designed by the architect Eric Parry. Strung up on tensioned wires, the sculpture suggests a floating body whose languid limbs would surely represent a literally unsuitable client for the cutters and sewers at, say, Dege & Skinner, or Huntsman and Sons.

Grand design: The architectural wonder that's transformed a private school

A magnificent £5m architectural masterpiece at Bryanston school is setting new standards for the fee-paying sector

Runa Islam, White Cube, London

Turner Prize hopeful loses the plot

Thomas Sutcliffe: There's not a moment that can't be wasted

I should have started writing this ages ago, frankly, but I got waylaid by an eye-catching statistic in one of the Sundays. Apparently the distracting electronic ping announcing the arrival of a new email has been calculated to be causing a 0.5 per cent drop in gross domestic product in the United States, at a cost to the economy of some $70bn a year.

The Weasel: Breaking the mould

Even though its infamous wobbliness is now firmly held in check, Lord Foster's Millennium Bridge continues to attract critical scrutiny. "How did they get it to stand up?" inquired a dubious Mrs W. "It must have been very stiff. A bit chewy I imagine." She had a point. The single-span crossing demands considerable material resilience. This is exactly what you want in a bridge, though it is rarely desirable in a raspberry jelly. It must be admitted that Mrs W's critique did not concern the "Blade of Light" as such. Her views were prompted by a gelatinous model of the structure from Foster & Partners. Apparently moulded in raspberry jelly (though it might have been the less satisfying strawberry version), it was one of the finalists in a jelly competition organised for the London Festival of Architecture, which runs until 20 July. Following an auction, successful bidders were able to spoon up all 10 on the short-list, including jellies of Nicholas Grimshaw's Eden Project and Richard Rogers's terminal at Madrid Airport.

Are architecture degrees flexible?

Laura Broderick the education advisor at the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (Cabe) gives her thoughts on studying architecture.

Architecture: practice makes perfect

Before their Part 3 examinations, architecture students need to build up their experience. Amy McLellan explains.

Comment: studying architecture

Architecture offers a heady mix of art, science and work-based learning says Sunand Prasad, the President of Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

Robert Harling: Typographer, designer, 'House & Garden' editor and author of riveting novels of 'old Fleet Street'

A month or so before the Second World War began in 1939, Robert Harling, not yet editor of House & Garden, met Ian Fleming, not yet synonymous with James Bond. The meeting was (as Harling found later) no accident.

Hannah Marshall: A new queen of darkness

Young designer Hannah Marshall has a fresh take on the classic LBD – a key piece for next season. Black is back, she tells Bethan Cole

Let the games commence

Building new sport stadia can be a tricky business – which is where surveyors come in useful.

Bridge over troubled water: Zaha Hadid's latest architectural creation

The new design by starchitect Zaha Hadid is a graceful and dynamic wonder that spans a political controversy. Jay Merrick reports from Spain
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A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting
Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

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UK's railways are entering a new golden age

New stations are opening across the country and our railways appear to be entering an era not seen in Britain since the early 1950s
Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

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Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

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Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014: Lionel Messi? Javier Mascherano is key for Argentina...

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Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

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The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

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A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

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Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice