News Police search the home of Adam Lanza

Some of the most important clues about what drove Adam Lanza to mass murder probably sit on the computer that the reclusive, technical-minded 20-year-old used as one of his main contacts with the world, law enforcement authorities said.

Too important for politics

What do the electioneering parties offer for architecture? Not very much at all, says Jonathan Glancey

Just don't go throwing stones

Boiling hot in summer, freezing cold in winter and open for all to see, glass houses are not everyone's idea of fun - but new advances in glass technology could soon make them a favourite. Lesley Gillilan reports

Architecture: When is a Denys Lasdun high-rise horror a pied-a- terre to die for? When it's in St James's

A preview of the retrospective exhibition of the life and work of Sir Denys Lasdun at the Royal Academy of Arts, which opened this week, has convinced me that the best architecture and the very best modern housing are, or can be, one and the same thing. If the "high-rise concrete horror homes" Sir Denys himself designed for a street in Bethnal Green in London's East End in the early Fifties had been built in, say, Hampstead or Knightsbridge, they would have been "luxury, architect-designed pieds- a-terre" for intellectuals and plutocrats.

Jonathan Glancey column

The discovery of Aristotle's Lyceum underneath a car park near the War Museum in central Athens has been greeted with a yawn by those for whom archaeology has become tarred with the Heritage brush. One commentator poo-poohing the fragments of building uncovered, called them "cultural dung". We have Aristotle's works (well, a fragment of them) and we live in his philosophical shadow, and that should be enough. Who cares what the Lyceum looked like? Let a thousand car parks bloom.

Obituary: Charlotte Haslam

Charlotte Haslam devoted nearly 20 years of her life to the Landmark Trust, a charity which rescues buildings in distress and gives them a new life by letting them for holidays. At first she was engaged in historical research; then she edited the trust's publications as well; and latterly she was also an architectural adviser and supervisor. For some years she was one of the trustees.

Letter : True to spirit of Reading Room

Sir: I should like to set the record straight concerning the future use of the Round Reading Room.

OBITUARY : Leonora Ison

Architectural history has produced few finer partnerships than that of Walter and Leonora Ison, the latter of whom was considered by Sir John Summerson to be one of the very best architectural draughtsmen of her generation.

Woman aims to smash the architects' glass ceiling

Maggie O'Farrell meets Clare Frankl, who wants to be president of Riba

Architecture: The shapes of things to come

The Venice Biennale of Architecture offers a chance to view tomorrow's buildings today. Bruce Bernard looks into the future

Letter: Nation of vandals

Nation of vandals

The new red telephone box? Or an alien in cold Perspex

It was like waiting for the return of a reassuring old friend, only to be greeted by a Perspex stranger. Nothing could better sum up the corporate dreariness of modern Britain than the unveiling of the new BT red telephone box yesterday.

Architecture: Annexe

The third in a series of talks organised by the RIBA Architecture with the Independent, "Making space for art - what does the public want?", is to be given by Charles Saumarez-Smith, director of the National Portrait Gallery, at 6.30pm, 20 June, 66 Portland Place, London W1. This is the third in a trio of lectures entitled "The Pulse of the City" looking at the cultural software that makes or breaks the identity of major cities. A third series is planned for the autumn. Tickets: call 0171-631 0460 between 1pm-5pm, Monday to Friday (credit card bookings), or, in person from the RIBA Bookshop, address as above.

Cover Story: Have airports become shopping centres with runways attached?

Passengers don't want to be reminded that they're about to fly five miles high in a glorified bus. Airports are there to help us forget, says Jonathan Glancey

Architecture: They're so Modern

Adam Caruso and Peter St John are about to put Walsall on the map with their innovative design for a new museum and art gallery. By Jonathan Glancey

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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us