Arts and Entertainment

A renowned sculptor and architect, both from Britain, were among the five artists to receive the prestigious Praemium Imperiale award, dubbed the “Japanese Nobel,” which comes with a cheque for £100,000.

Hockney paints a birthday reunion

The artist (left), 60 in July, is marking the occasion by showing portraits of his family and friends which must be sold together. Ros Wynne- Jones discovers why

Wall flowers

It's a big year for David Hockney. He is 60 in the summer, and has his first major show for a decade. So what is it with all the pretty flowers? Here, the old master talks to Gordon Burn about sex, drugs and staying home. Photograph by David Gamble

Springtime for Hockney as he paints the town with flowers

For the art world, 1 May will have a significance beyond the general election. David Hockney is to give his first major British show of paintings for nearly a decade.

Ossie Clark's killer jailed

The Sixties fashion guru Ossie Clark was killed by his former boyfriend in a frenzied knife attack because he believed the designer was the devil, the Old Bailey was told yesterday, writes Nicole Veash.

Hockney's friends help the deaf

David Hockney, the artist who confesses to being mad about dogs, has donated a famous print of his canine best friends Stanley and Boodgie to a charity for deafness. Hearing Dogs for the Deaf, which trains dogs to alert a deaf person by touch and to guide them to a sound, contacted Hockney last year asking for his support, and he gave the charity permission to print 1,000 copies of the dachshund sketch.

Between pages 10 and 11, your own Hockney original "Two Apples & One Lemon & Four Flowers"

The David Hockney NewsPrint published in the centre of today's Independent Tabloid is not a reproduction - a photograph of something else. It is the artwork itself. How, in a newspaper, can that be so?

Obituary: Barry Prothero

Barry Prothero was a committed fighter for gay liberation and an innovative curator, who helped set up and direct the Angel Row Gallery for Nottinghamshire County Council.

Arts: The fabulous, fabulous world of Kemp

After a lifetime of not being girl enough for his mother, 30 years of not being straight enough for the dance critics, Lindsay Kemp is at last being taken seriously - at least abroad. Michael Church caught up with the flamboyant iconoclast last week during rehearsals for Variete, his first home-grown product in two decades

The Sixties survivor

Ossie Clark made the dresses, Celia Birtwell designed the fabrics When their marriage ended so did his career. Hers has thrived.

Presidential portrait leads with the chin

Bill Clinton returned to Oxford last week in the guise of a major portrait - unveiled in the medieval hall of University College, where he studied nearly 30 years ago.

FIVE BEST EXHIBITIONS

AFRICA. Highly ambitious survey of "the art of a continent", from the earliest objects made by man to the modern age. Too much to take in, but a very helpful installation. Royal Academy, W1 (0171 439 7438), to 21 Jan. Daily 10-6.

If you're jobless the unemployment rate is 100 per cent

I have been at my most Gradgrindish for the past few months. At conferences I appear doomed to parade the view that capitalism is really doing pretty well for the world's poor. I patter out my routine that the world is feeding, pretty well, a hugely increased number of people. I say - this is very Gradgrind indeed - that a larger proportion of this hugely increased population is doing well than ever before in history. I point out that I understand well enough that the absolute number of poor is rising, but with comforting slowness. I tease out for bemused audiences that these two positions aren't incompatible.

POETRY IN NEED: PLEASE SEND MONEY

"THOSE who can, do; those who can't, teach." Rubbish. Lots of people, and lots of writers, do both - especially at courses run by the Arvon Foundation at its three centres at Lumb Bank in West Yorkshire, Totleigh Barton in Devon and Moniack Mhor in the Scottish Highlands.

LETTER : DRAWING FOR STUDENTS

RE David Hockney's denunciation of art schools for failing to teach drawing ("Pupils go back to the drawing board ...", 12 November). We set up the foundation course at the Central School of Art and Design in 1963 and drawing was a major part of the student's work. Our students have never left the drawing board.

ARTS : Doodling on the margins

EXHIBITIONS : The retrospective of his drawings proves one thing - despite his fame, David Hockney is not in the mainstream of modern art
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