Arts and Entertainment

A renowned sculptor and architect, both from Britain, were among the five artists to receive the prestigious Praemium Imperiale award, dubbed the “Japanese Nobel,” which comes with a cheque for £100,000.

BOOK REVIEW / Void between celebrities: 'Educating William' - William Cash: Simon & Schuster, 16.99

WILLIAM CASH, after two years as West Coast correspondent for the Times, has written up the experience as his 'memoirs'. Yet the book purports to do something more, namely 'hurl a few javelins into the fruity and crazy caboodle that is modern Tinseltown'.

They're going to set the lines buzzing

IT WAS one of those little coincidences. This week's news from British Telecom that it was cutting the price of weekend phone calls to a maximum of 10p for three minutes came out on the same day that postage rates went up yet again. Once upon a time it was actually cheaper to send a letter than to make even a local phone call. Now it is vastly more expensive - in fact it is cheaper to make a quick transatlantic call than to drop a note in the post.

Letter: The Britain that the tourists want to see

Sir: Should tourism to Britain really be promoted with photographs of Richard Rogers' overblown Lloyd's building ('This tourist trap, set in a silver sea', 18 June)? Not only is the building a paradigm of intellectual enervation, it is also the eponymous headquarters of a collapsing institution that for years was synonymous with the City of London being the world's financial capital. No more, alas.

City: Wrong track

About the best that can be said for the Commons National Heritage Select Committee report on the price of compact discs, published last week, is that it is short - just 10 pages, to be precise. In almost every other respect, however, it has to rate as one of the most daft, predictable and ultimately irrelevant pieces of unthinking consumerism ever to have come out of the select committee system - and that's saying something. The committee singularly failed to prove its case that there is any kind of monopoly operating in the supply of music or that there is anything wrong in the way the industry prices CDs.

The Sunday Preview: Liverpool shows off Bradford's finest

IN THE Sixties David Hockney's prices went so high so quickly that the Tate didn't manage to buy some of his most characteristic work. Now it is catching up, and this show at the Tate Gallery Liverpool includes recent purchases of his prints - always the most charming and convincing part of Hockney's production - as well as material borrowed from other galleries, including The First Marriage (above) of 1962, usually held at the Tate Gallery London. In all, a mini- retrospective, with emphasis on poetry, photography and Picasso. Look out for the etchings in illustration of the poems of C P Cavafy, made in 1966, the Cubist prints from the Eighties and an interesting display of Hockney's photographic sources. But we shouldn't be over-serious about his career: from Bradford to London to Los Angeles and back again, he's the tops in international chic. Tate Gallery Liverpool, 051-709 0507, from Wed to Feb 1994. (Photograph omitted)

Dates to be stamped on the memory

NEXT year will be an important one for British collectors, with an increasingly fast flow of new commemorative stamps, new banknotes and new coins being issued by the Government. In case you might be caught napping, here is a checklist of the most important issues lined up for the first half of the year.

Appeals: The Serpentine Gallery

Red Jug and Lamp, 1992, a print by Patrick Caulfield (born 1936) and one of a limited edition of 150 on sale to raise funds for the Serpentine Gallery, in London. The gallery is holding a retrospective exhibition of the artist's work, until Sunday 17 January.

A colourful double act: Die Frau ohne Schatten reunites David Hockney with director John Cox, the man who brought the artist into opera nearly 20 years ago. Here the director talks to Anthony Peattie about their collaborations

SO FAR the brouhaha surrounding Covent Garden's new production of Die Frau ohne Schatten has focused on its designer, David Hockney. Naturally enough: his most recent work in the theatre has been abroad - Tristan und Isolde in Los Angeles (1987) and Turandot in Chicago (1992). But what distinguishes this production is that in Frau, for the first time since the Stravinsky triple bill of 1981 (at the Metropolitan Opera, New York), Hockney has collaborated with a director. On this occasion at least it would be a mistake to ignore the contribution of Frau's director - John Cox.

MUSIC / Perfect mix: Edward Seckerson reviews Glyndebourne Touring Opera's The Rake's Progress

As surely as Tom Rakewell is bound to Nick Shadow, Stravinsky's opera and David Hockney's decor are the definitive item. They are perfect together: Stravinsky's score all rhythm and roulade, fragrant yet pithy, precise yet free; Hockney's sets likewise, soft colours lifted with inky line-drawings, sharply etched and yet fluid, geometrical and yet full of cunning displacements. You see what you hear - and it's crisp, airy, witty. Stravinsky alludes to Mozart and the Italian bel cantists, Hockney to Hogarth, but they do so with a devilish virtuosity all of their own.

Hockney stamp

David Hockney artwork goes on sale for 24p today, with the issue of this stamp to mark the single European market. The stamp, launched at the 1853 Gallery, near Bradford, West Yorkshire, which contains 300 Hockney works, features a stylized yellow star from the EC flag on an ultramarine background.

Honorary doctorate for Hockney

David Hockney at the Royal College of Art in London portrayed in the style that he made famous when he made a montage of Polaroid photographs. He received an honorary doctorate from the college at the Royal Albert Hall yesterday
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