Money

Many people will have made a resolution to reorganise their money matters this year – it's probably one of the top three 2014 promises, alongside shedding a bit of weight and doing more exercise.

Violent storms hit middle America after tornadoes

A line of violent thunderstorms roared across middle America, killing six people in two states, with several tornadoes touching down in Oklahoma and high winds pounding rural Kansas.

Minnows plan protest over 'illegal' cars

The smallest team on the grid may be set to influence the outcome of next week's Monaco Grand Prix, if HRT team boss Colin Kolles decides to protest the result because of what he believes are illegalities in the cars driven by favourites Jenson Button, Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel, among others.

Bath and Wakefield: Magical museums

Two striking new galleries in Bath and Wakefield are beacons for daring, ambitious architecture – even in an age of financial cutbacks, says Jay Merrick

Michael Nee: Much-loved dentist who built up a successful Harley Street practice

Michael Nee was a man so full of life and its joys that his sudden and unexpected death from a pulmonary embolism left his family and countless friends not only heart-broken but incredulous. Born in Athlone in the centre of Ireland in 1942, he was brought up with a close awareness of his country's recent history, and was a warm, shrewd and witty commentator on the life, politics and literature of his native country. He was an outstanding schoolboy athlete, winning the Irish schoolboy sprint championship, and holding the Connaught long jump record for 30 years, as well as playing rugby as a fleet-footed fly-half at the highest schoolboy and university levels.

Don't let dental bills give you a toothache

As the cost of NHS treatment rises, insurance cover and dental plans could be the way to protect your oral health. Chiara Cavaglieri reports

Letters: Threat to cyclists

The threat of death comes from cars

Iphigenia In Forest Hills, By Janet Malcolm

As soon as I read this bizarre murder story, I felt impelled to read it again. It is impossible to put down. In 2009, New Yorker writer Janet Malcolm – whose previous literary investigations include In the Freud Archives and The Journalist and the Murderer – attended the trial of Dr Mazoltuv Borukhova for the murder of her estranged husband, dentist Daniel Malakov. Borukhova was alleged to have paid a hit man. Malcolm's writing is not a cold courtroom analysis but an impassioned examination of a complex history which includes child abuse, sexual taboo and a ringside trial seat in front of the famous "hanging judge", Robert Hanophy.

Glasgow University could scrap language courses because of budget cuts

Can Britain afford to deprive its students of the linguistic skills that would make them internationally competitive?

William Hill gambles on expansion into the US

William Hill, Britain's biggest bookmaker, has put down a $39m (£24m) wager on the US market, buying two Nevada sports-betting firms in what it promises is just the start of its international adventure.

Paul Kriwaczek: BBC TV producer and author of engaging books on the ancient world

Paul Kriwaczek was a radio and television producer and latterly an historian and author, a man whose cultural versatility and intellectual adventurousness were reflected in a richly variegated career.

Waley-Cohen chases Oscar triumph to produce unique amateur double

Dashing adventurer tells Chris McGrath how matching his Gold Cup win would make a 'dream year'

Letter from the editor: So much for Harrow!

Every day, when I finish this missive, I ask one or two of my senior colleagues to read it through. They say that it’s just an expression of my need for external validation (thanks very much, boys, but I pay a shrink good money to tell me things like that).

Berlusconi absence sees 'Rubygate' sex trial adjourned after just nine minutes

After the breathless build-up, Silvio Berlusconi's hotly anticipated "Rubygate" sex trial came to a premature halt yesterday after just nine minutes – rather less time than it took for one of the Italian Prime Minister's alleged "bunga bunga" sessions.

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine