Life and Style Only 3.4 per cent of the Solihull area is covered by housing

It isn’t hard to find an architect who will tell you that vast swathes of the British urban landscape are ugly, grey and unappealing – nor would you struggle to find people who agreed with them. But could it be that the look and the layout of our cities is actually bad for our health?

A diabetes test: Diabetes rates are soaring in the United States

Diabetes rates soar as 18 States see diagnosed cases double

The number of people living with diabetes is soaring in the United States, as 18 states had at least a doubling in those with the illness since 1995, a government survey found.

Nasal spray developed that could end daily injections for sufferers of Type 1 diabetes

A nasal spray has been developed that could mean an end to daily injections for sufferers of Type 1 diabetes.

Diabetics die through lack of care, say MPs

Patients with diabetes are developing potentially life-threatening complications because they are not receiving the straightforward care and support they need, MPs have warned.

Existing drugs could be used to tackle dementia, say scientists

Medications used to treat hypertension, diabetes and skin conditions could also treat dementia, according to new research.

You are slowly being poisoned by arsenic

It's a poison most associated with vengeful Victorian housemaids and spurned lovers, but as The Huffington Post reports today, arsenic has so many uses in the modern world that you may well be feeling the ill-effects of the substance without even knowing it.

Ulcers linked to 'earlier death'

Diabetic patients who develop foot ulcers are more likely to die prematurely than those who do not, a study has suggested.

James Moore: Former vet aims to give Astra the treatment

Outlook Can a vet help AstraZeneca unearth the human treatments that will secure a profitable future for the company? We're about to find out.

The number of diabetics doubled to 3.1 million between 1994 and 2009

Number of diabetes prescriptions tops 40 million

Diabetes prescription numbers topped 40 million for the first time last year, according to official figures.

Last night's viewing - Horizon: Eat, Fast and Live Longer, BBC2; Jimmy's Forest, More4

Michael Mosley has been making quite a nice living out of trying to live longer just recently. Not very long ago, he did a Horizon on exercise, exploring recent research that suggested that you could reduce the amount of exercise you need to do to stay fit and healthy to just three minutes of flat-out effort a week. He rather hinted that he would be taking up this new regime, but here he was in Horizon: Eat, Fast and Live Longer presenting himself as a man still in need of some kind of lifestyle miracle.

Terence Blacker: Generation Sloth are the victims of a betrayal

Taking exercise should be a part of any civilised education

Inactivity 'as bad as smoking'

Sitting about doing nothing is as damaging to health as smoking, doctors say.

Adults should have risk assessment for diabetes, watchdog warns

All adults aged 40 and above should have a risk assessment for type 2 diabetes, according to the healthcare watchdog.

Tobias: as well as his work on Homo habilis, he also described a new Australopithecus species

Phillip Tobias: Anthropologist who discovered Homo habilis and fought against apartheid

Phillip Tobias was a palaeoanthropologist who broadened and deepened our knowledge of the earliest history of the human-like species that came before our own. Working together with Mary and Louis Leakey he discovered and documented Homo habilis, a two million-year-old possible ancestor and one of the earliest users of tools. More recently he collaborated with Professor Ron Clarke in describing a new Australopithecus species, from a fossil skeleton dubbed Little Foot, which dates back some three million years or more.

Waistline of '57% of women too big'

The waistlines of more than half of women are too big, experts have said, as they warned those who are overweight they are increasing their risk of cancer and infertility.

Diabetes drug increases cancer risk

A commonly prescribed diabetes drug increases the risk of bladder cancer, research has found.

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Solar power will help bring down electricity prices over the next five years, according to a new report. But it’s cheap imports of ‘dirty power’ that will lower them the most
Katy Perry prevented from buying California convent for $14.5m after nuns sell to local businesswoman instead

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Ajmer: The ancient Indian metropolis chosen to be a 'smart city' where residents would just be happy to have power and running water

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The Indian Government has launched an ambitious plan to transform 100 of its crumbling cities
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Films of Macbeth don’t always end well - just ask Orson Welles... and Keith Chegwin
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Women's World Cup 2015: How England's semi-final success could do wonders for both sexes

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How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth: Would people co-operate to face down a global peril?

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Just one day to find €1.6bn: Greece edges nearer euro exit

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New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

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Public are being asked to help improve the map