Voices

I'm in the Ardèche for a holiday with family and assorted friends. I haven't worn shoes for 10 days and am growing a beard that is turning out to be unnervingly grey. All is good … well almost all.

On hold: Armen Nazaryan says ‘from now on I will drink only syrup’

Wrestling may be back in the rings

All is not lost for one of the oldest Olympic disciplines as rival politicians form an unlikely tag team

George Galloway is treated as eccentric or a rogue but was a lone voice against devastating Iraqi sanctions

Patrick Cockburn: Galloway won for some very good reasons

World View: Commentators who portray him as a self-serving demagogue are only showing their own biases

Last Night's TV: 9/11: the Day That Changed the World/ITV1<br />Elegance and Decadence &ndash; the Age of the Regency/BBC4

It isn't easy to say new things about 9/11. Short of having Dick Cheney pitch up on screen and say, "OK... I'm sick of lying... we planned the whole thing in advance", it's quite hard to think of something that would really shake our received understanding of the event. But anniversaries come round and commissioning editors are as helplessly instinctive in their presence as a dog in front of a lamppost. So inevitably we get more documentaries in which those who were there run through the memories again. Channel 4 started things off on Wednesday night, focusing on the firefighters' experience, and last night ITV got in on the commemorative act with 9/11: the Day That Changed the World. Both of them replayed the same familiar footage of plane strikes and tower collapse (still compelling after countless viewings). And both of them captured the chaos and grief of the day. But what individual merit now comes down to in these things is usually fresh personnel and filled-in detail.

Cheney tried to persuade President Bush to bomb Syria

Combative vice-president's memoirs detail his battles with his colleagues

Rumsfeld to be sued over alleged torture

A judge is allowing an army veteran who says he was imprisoned unjustly and tortured by the US military in Iraq to sue the former defence secretary Donald Rumsfeld personally for damages.

Free Radicals: The Secret Anarchy of Science, By Michael Brooks<br/>Litmus: Short Stories from Modern Science, Edited by Ra Page

These days science is either nothing or it's the new religion. But, as both these books show in their different ways, the practice of science inhabits the broad territory between these extremes and exhibits the full Monty of human behaviour. Science is the most reliable form of knowledge we have but it is arrived at by unreliable means. Cutting-edge research deals with the unknown unknowns, as the unwitting philosopher of science Donald Rumsfeld put it, and there is no formula or methodology for achieving that.

Loyalty, Hampstead Theatre, London

Imagine feeling bitterly opposed to the invasion of Iraq at the same time as being the long-term partner of Jonathan Powell, Tony Blair's Chief of Staff and closest adviser. It sounds like an almost parodically privileged position from which to absorb first-hand material for a play that tightly intertwines the personal and political while also titillating us with its insider-insights and the splatting sound of old scores being settled. But Sarah Helm, a former journalist with The Independent who reported from Baghdad in the mid-1990s, has come up with a debut stage-drama, Loyalty, that stubbornly fails to catch fire, despite its clearly authentic detail and its flashes of bruised comedy.

Super refit: Superman gets another makeover

Whether he's fighting Hitler or giving up his US citizenship, Superman is an ever-evolving character. Phil Boucher finds out about the Man of Steel's latest redux

Twitter law: A little bird told me

It's a melting pot of fact, fiction and fantasy, where anyone can say what they like without fear of the consequences. So is Twitter making an ass of the law &ndash; or of the people who use it?

None of Us Were Like This Before, By Joshua E S Phillips

Casualties of war still under fire

The Weekend's TV: The Event, Fri, Channel 4<br/>Single Father, Sun, BBC1

There's a runaway plot heading straight for us

Rumsfeld memoir to reveal what he knows of the unknown

Even casual addicts of American politics are likely to pounce on Known and Unknown, the memoir that Donald Rumsfeld has been writing since resigning as George W Bush's Defence Secretary in 2006. Sentinel Books, an imprint of Penguin, said last night that it will be released in January next year.

Julian Knight: Don&rsquo;t forget &lsquo;Old Europe&rsquo; if looking for investment growth

While the emerging Bric countries are still attractive, Germany, France and Switzerland still have their place

On Art and War and Terror, By Alex Danchev

Throughout the 1960s George Steiner published an extraordinary series of essays which argued that art, literature and culture were deeply implicated in the worst atrocities of the first half of the 20th century. For Steiner the man who can read "Goethe and Rilke in the evening" and go to his "day's work at Auschwitz in the morning" throws into disarray the humanising claims of the humanities.

How Bush went from hero to zero in the eyes of Dick Cheney

Memoirs to tell of Veep's change of heart in waning years of presidency
News
Emma Watson has become the latest target of the 4Chan nude hacking scandal
peopleThreats follows actress' speech on feminism and equality at the UN
Arts and Entertainment
British actor Idris Elba is also a DJ and rapper who played Ibiza last summer
film
Arts and Entertainment
Geena Davis, founder and chair of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media
tv
News
Alan Bennett criticised the lack of fairness in British society encapsulated by the private school system
peopleBut he does like Stewart Lee
Sport
David Moyes and Louis van Gaal
football
Arts and Entertainment
Rita Ora will replace Kylie Minogue as a judge on The Voice 2015
tv
Life and Style
tech
Life and Style
Alan Turing, who was convicted of gross indecency in 1952, was granted a royal pardon last year
life
Arts and Entertainment
Sheridan Smith as Cilla Black and Ed Stoppard as her manager Brian Epstein
tvCilla Episode 2 review: Grit under the glamour in part two of biopic series starring Sheridan Smith
Life and Style
life
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Secret politics of the weekly shop

The politics of the weekly shop

New app reveals political leanings of food companies
Beam me up, Scottie!

Beam me up, Scottie!

Celebrity Trekkies from Alex Salmond to Barack Obama
Beware Wet Paint: The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition

Beware Wet Paint

The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition
Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

Can 'The Endless River' carry on the tradition?
Sanctuary for the suicidal

Sanctuary for the suicidal

One mother's story of how London charity Maytree helped her son with his depression
A roller-coaster tale from the 'voice of a generation'

Not That Kind of Girl:

A roller-coaster tale from 'voice of a generation' Lena Dunham
London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice. In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence

London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice

In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence
Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with Malcolm McLaren

Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with McLaren

Designer 'felt pressured' into going out with Sex Pistols manager
Jourdan Dunn: Model mother

Model mother

Jordan Dunn became one of the best-paid models in the world
Apple still coolest brand – despite U2 PR disaster

Apple still the coolest brand

Despite PR disaster of free U2 album
Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

Scrambled eggs and LSD

Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

New leading ladies of dance fight back

How female vocalists are now writing their own hits