Arts and Entertainment

Boyd’s Bond is driven but torn

Brasserie Chavot, 41 Conduit Street, London W1

Amol Rajan finds bad upholstery undermines good food at Eric Chavot's newest spot

The seized Lamborghini Aventador on display outside New Scotland Yard

Glow-in-the-dark supercar gets ANOTHER ticket

The famous Lamborghini was impounded last week and presented as a trophy in police crackdown on uninsured drivers

The X Factor judge and ex-N-Dubz singer Tulisa Contostavlos

Tulisa Contostavlos bailed following arrest on suspicion of supplying £800 of class A drugs

Former X Factor judge Tulisa Contostavlos has been arrested on suspicion of supplying class A drugs.

Stan Charlton: Rugged full-back for 1950s Arsenal

Stan Charlton: Rugged full-back for 1950s Arsenal

Born into a footballing family, but not the same one as his famous namesakes

Double-decker college bus carrying 56 students crashes and overturns in Dorset field

A double decker bus carrying 56 college students has crashed and overturned in a field in Dorset.

JJB's collapse will serve as another blow to the high street

2,200 jobs go in JJB Sports deal

Around 2,200 staff at JJB Sports were made redundant today after administrators closed 133 stores and agreed to sell 20 remaining outlets to Mike Ashley's Sports Direct International.

Britain braces for more rain and flooding chaos

Residents across the UK are bracing themselves for further flooding with heavy downpours predicted to heap more misery on rain-drenched areas of Britain.

The Lawn Bistro, 67 High Street, London SW19

The actual tennis of Wimbledon is played in Southfields, two Tube stops away from the famous suburb, but that doesn't stop the world and his tennis partner from descending on the Village like the Assyrians on Jerusalem. What they find to eat when they arrive can be uninspiring. For every good, reliable restaurant (such as San Lorenzo Fuoriporto at the bottom of the hill), there are too many yawn-making gastropubs, chains and iffy spice houses.

Tourists face a ban on buying drugs from Amsterdam coffee shops

Open Jaw: Short flight, small plane?

Where readers write back

Kate Bush scoops South Bank award

Reclusive singer Kate Bush pipped Adele to a prestigious prize after her latest album was recognised at the South Bank Sky Arts Awards.

Lorry driver jailed for crashing fuel tanker into estranged wife's home

An Army veteran who crashed a tanker laden with 2,000 litres of fuel into his estranged wife's home in an attempt to destroy it has been jailed for seven years.

Jersey Royals grow by the island's Gorey Harbour

Food miles: Spring's bounty is all over these isles – and waiting to be eaten

Spring is an exciting time for gourmet travel in Britain. The fields, hills and hedgerows are abundant with delicious seasonal treats including asparagus, wild morel mushrooms and lamb, providing inspiration for restaurant menus, cookery classes and events all over the UK.

The Dorchester is one of more than 100 outlets suporting Citizens UK

Dorchester pledges to help feed needy

London's poverty-stricken elderly citizens could soon be enjoying swapping meals on wheels and soup for Michelin-starred food straight from the kitchens of one of the capital's most luxurious hotels.

The Prince's environmental values have been called into question

First Poundbury, now Port-au-Prince: the Prince with a craving for paving

Charles's ambitious housebuilding plans are not to everybody's tastes, Michael McCarthy discovers

Business Diary: Is the CBI running scared?

It rather sounds as if the beasts of big business have been spooked by protesters such as the "Occupy" campaign. The instructions for journalists attending today's annual conference of the Confederation of British Industry are full of dire warnings about the strict security arrangements in place. Moreover, John Cridland, the CBI's director-general, is not even revealing who from the Government will address the conference, promising only that the keynote address will be made by a "senior UK politician".

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine