News Bulgarian President Rosen Plevneliev has warned David Cameron against turning to 'isolation and nationalism' in order to win votes

Lib Dem Business Secretary Vince Cable says controversial 75,000 cap on migrants ‘isn’t going to happen’

Our society needs outsiders

What Jack Straw truly loathes is the apparent anarchy with which travellers operate

Letter: Ugly deeds in Dover

Sir: Lord Bassam (Right of Reply, 20 August) says, "We've got officials working in the source countries to ensure we don't end up with the problem we've been confronted with over the last few months, which we accept is intolerable". This sentence does not make clear what Lord Bassam finds intolerable, and David Aaronovitch ("Let Dover stew in its disgusting narrow-mindedness and prejudice", 18 August) was entitled to his suspicion that Lord Bassam was referring to the number of people claiming asylum in this country.

Widdecombe says Britain is a soft touch for asylum-seekers

BRITAIN IS regarded as a soft touch by asylum-seekers, Ann Widdecombe, opposition home affairs spokeswoman, said. Her attack came as the Home Office was due to publish figuresshowing a record in applications to live in this country.

Letters: Victims of Dover

Victims of Dover

Channel swimmer drowned

A MEXICAN woman drowned yesterday trying to swim the English Channel.

Letter: Dover's problems

Sir: I should like to thank David Aaronovitch for putting the scale of the issue in perspective and for having the moral courage to challenge the motivation of those who are critical of the refugees. We like to gloat at German intolerance when their thugs attack Turkish immigrants, but we never seem to see the beam in our own eye.

Dover refugees `moving in days'

ASYLUM-SEEKERS could be moved from Dover within days, Kent County Council leaders said yesterday after talks with the Home Office over tension in the port. Some of the 800 asylum-seekers in Dover will go to Leeds. Other local authorities are being urged to house some of Kent's total of 5,000.

Right of Reply: Lord Bassam

The Home Office minister replies to David Aaronovitch's accusation that in his remarks on the plight of asylum- seekers in Dover he was `excusing intolerance'

Every council asked to take in refugees

EVERY COUNCIL in England and Wales has been asked to house asylum- seekers to help to reduce the burden on Channel ports. Sir Jeremy Beecham, chairman of the Local Government Association, has written to all 400 of them after weekend violence between asylum-seekers and residents in Dover left 11 people with knife wounds.

Let Dover stew in its disgusting narrow-mindedness and prejudice

THE WORD "influx" is defined in The Concise Oxford Dictionary as meaning a "flowing in of persons or things". And it is the watery word that the BBC is currently using - unapostrophised - to describe the entry to Britain of asylum-seekers. Reporters for the corporation evidently observe a land into which a constant stream of foreigners runs; gentle but irresistible.

Refugees and the residents trapped in a stormy port

ON THE promenade above Dover's pebble beach a plaque commemorates those who served in the Second World War protecting "Frontline Britain". Half a century on many locals would have you believe nothing has changed and that the town famous for its white cliffs and ferry terminals deserves the same description. This time they are defending the frontline not against Hitler, but asylum-seekers pouring in from the Continent.

Evacuation of `dumped' refugees

HUNDREDS OF refugees are to be evacuated from Dover and rehoused in the north of England after a government minister admitted yesterday that they were living in intolerable conditions.

Police calm tension in Dover

POLICE FROM across Kent were drafted on to the streets of Dover yesterday after violent weekend confrontations between residents and refugees left 11 people injured, some with stab wounds.

Refugees clash with Dover locals

VIOLENT confrontations between residents and refugees in Dover left five people in hospital last night, including some with stab wounds.

You ask the questions: (Such as: Dame Vera Lynn, didn't you ever get sick of singing `The White Cliffs of Dover'?)

DAME VERA Lynn was born in 1917. She grew up in East Ham, and made her first public singing appearance at the age of seven. She sang for troops during the Second World War; her hits include "We'll Meet Again", "White Cliffs of Dover" and "Yours". With "Auf Wiedersehen", she became the first British artiste to top the American hit parade. She married her manager, Harry Lewis, in 1941 and they had one daughter. She was awarded an OBE in 1969 and became a dame in 1975. She is a founder member of SOS (Stars Organisation for Spastics), and raises money for Scope. Now aged 82, she lives in Ditchling, East Sussex.
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Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

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Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness