Extras

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

Letter: How not to treat the Daleks

Sir: I am a 13-year-old Dr Who fanatic. I agree with David Lister in his letter to Steven Spielberg (11 March) that it is ludicrous to have an American play the part of 'Doctor' and Daleks screaming 'I will exterminate you' with an American accent. But Mr Lister is wrong to say that there has been no whiff of romance in the Doctor's life. In the book of the BBC series Doctor Who and the Aztecs, Carmeca, a female Aztec, turns to the Doctor and kisses him on both cheeks, saying, 'Oh sweet favoured man, you have declared your love for me, and I acknowledge and accept your gentle proposal.'

FILM / Rebirth of a salesman: How on earth did the same man make 'Jurassic Park', and then this? David Thomson explains

THERE'S something serene and unnerving, something more, or less, than human about Steven Spielberg. It's as if, rather than just striving to be himself, he was actually responding to some perilous, deep-seated urge: 'I can be anything.' There are ways in which he intrigues the biographer in me, for this is one of the most telling American lives of the last half-century. So far, let me stress, for he's only 46, no matter that he's been a fixture for two decades. He's done so much; yet as a man he's so unremarkable. Is there enough of him that's real or ordinary, or is he maybe as ageless and steeped in alien wisdom as his own ET?

Letter: Spielberg's dramatic epic of the Holocaust

Sir: Howard Jacobson's article on Steven Spielberg and Schindler's List ('Jacobson's list', 2 February) concludes that the film is not a masterpiece and that we have nothing to cheer about.

A camera trained on hell: Can any feature film portray the Holocaust? Neal Ascherson is moved by 'Schindler's List' but doubts the achievement is possible

IN John Donne's 'Nocturnal upon St Lucy's Day', he wrote of '. . . absence, darkness, death: things which are not'. When I came out of a preview of Steven Spielberg's film Schindler's List and wandered off down a London street in the rain, those familiar words insisted that they were important.

Saturday Night: Horror stalks the stalls

STEVEN SPIELBERG is not a good director in the conventional sense. His characters assume recognisable human attributes only when they are dramatically endangered. He seems unable to represent emotions other than the primitive staples of terror, awe and a sentimental yearning for the nuclear family with its clearly defined relationships.

Spielberg accord on Auschwitz

New York (Reuter) - Steven Spielberg has scaled back his plans to make part of his next film at Auschwitz under an agreement aimed at meeting objections from survivors of the Nazi death camp, officials of the World Jewish Congress said.
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003