Here is the news: Radio 4 presenter is love child of a 1960s BBC anchorman

It takes a lot to shock John Humphrys. But when Justin Webb, his co-host on the Today programme, revealed that he was the secret love child of the Welshman's old BBC colleague, the newsreader Peter Woods, even Humphrys was taken aback.

Prince honours Berlin's fallen

Prince Harry visited the Brandenurg Gate and the Berlin Wall memorial yesterday, laying a wreath to those killed trying to escape from East Germany between 1967 and 1989. The visit followed the Prince's appearance on German television's largest charity benefit, Ein Herz für Kinder (A Heart for Children), on Saturday.

Gerhard Beil: Politician who helped bring down the Berlin Wall

Gerhard Beil appeared to be as calm as he sat, with two others, at the historic press conference on 9 November 1989 at which their senior colleague, Günter Schabowski, answered a question about when the Berlin Wall and the GDR's frontiers would be opened.

How did the AK-47 become the most abundant weapon on earth?

It's the most abundant gun on earth, used by national armies, guerrillas and gangsters. How did this simple firearm, created by committee in Soviet Russia, come to monopolise violence? Pulitzer-Prize winning reporter CJ Chivers dismantles the myth and symbolism of the AK-47

Rescued from the shredder, Carlos the Jackal's missing years

Stasi documents fill the hole in terrorist's biography – and reveal his charmed life in East Germany while a fugitive from the West

Andy Holmes: Rower whose partnership with Steve Redgrave sparked a British renaissance in the sport

Andy Holmes, part of the gold-winning crew at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and gold-winning partner to Steve Redgrave at the 1988 Seoul Olympics, was part of Britain's rowing renaissance and helped provide the foundations on which Britain's now long-standing success in the sport is built. The LA gold ended a 36-year drought in the sport.

Berlin Wall shooting game draws criticism

A German student has created a computer game giving players a taste of life as an East German border guard shooting political fugitives fleeing to the West, to the outrage of victims' relatives.

Bärbel Bohley: Political activist who played a key role in the dismantling of the East German state

Bärbel Bohley was a key figure in the attempts in the 1980s to bring democratic changes to the highly undemocratic German Democratic Republic, so much so that some called her the Jeanne d'Arc of the peaceful revolution of 1989. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who grew up in the GDR, said of her, "For many, including for me, her courage and her directness were exemplary. I remember her as a personality who made possible the peaceful revolution and the road to German unity."

Travels with a Typewriter: A Reporter at Large, By Michael Frayn

The title of this rather disjointed collection – a compilation of Michael Frayn's journalism from the 1960s and 1970s – is misleading. There is travel writing here, but there are also snatches of memoir, social history and literary criticism. (An insightful, if rather incongruous, study of Anthony Powell's A Dance to the Music of Time is included.) But the incontestable quality of Frayn's writing holds all these disparate elements together.

After a quarter of a century, Koch remains untouchable

Male records are being broken every other week but marks set by dubious East German should not stand

Leading article: A contested President

The election of a German President is usually little more than formality. Not this time. The victor was expected to be Christian Wulff, premier of Lower Saxony and self-styled "quiet moderniser" of the centre-right CDU. But yesterday's electoral college ballot was a long way from being business as usual in German politics. Yet, the whole contest was out of the ordinary and weakens the authority of Chancellor Merkel personally, and that of her CDU-FDP coalition.

Anti-communist pastor who could turn out to be Merkel's nemesis

Challenge from Joachim Gauck threatens to derail Chancellor's risky strategy of supporting party rival for presidency

Why Berlin cannot forget the Stasi

Germans despised the Communists' secret police, yet a battle rages to preserve a museum in their memory

Robin Scott-Elliot: How Corden curse stops Britain's girls making a splash

View From The Sofa: Olympic Dreams, BBC

Otmar Suitner: Conductor who was the last surviving product of Germany's 'Kapellmeister' tradition

Otmar Suitner must be the only conductor to have been honoured both by the Communist government of East Germany, with the National Prize in 1963, and the Catholic church, when Pope Paul VI bestowed the Order of St Gregory on him 10 years later. As it turned out, his musical career was not the only thing Suitner had to balance over the fulcrum of the Berlin Wall.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003